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Remarks by Governor Wolf at the Expanded PennDOT Technology Pilot Announcement

first_img Remarks PennDOT District 8 HeadquartersHarrisburg, PA October 22, 2015 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Remarks by Governor Wolf at the Expanded PennDOT Technology Pilot Announcementlast_img

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Encore

first_imgMembers of the USC Thornton Symphony played in Bovard Auditorium on Thursday as part of the annual Concerto Night concert. The concert was conducted by Thornton faculty member Lucinda Carver and featured student soloists Ying Huang on piano, Peter Myers on cello and Zee-Woong Munn on tuba. The symphony played classical standards from Brahms, Walton and Koestier.Candice Harbour | Daily Trojanlast_img

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Fort Drum soldiers spend all-access weekend with Syracuse

first_imgCapt. Greg Durso stood on Syracuse’s sideline just more than an hour before the Orange played No. 1 Clemson. He and SFC Shane Hankey made their rounds behind the white lines, now guests in SU’s home. Durso has hosted the players and coaches at his, Fort Drum, but Saturday was his chance to be a fan for a change.“That’s the partnership, right?” Durso said, “That we show them what we do as our team, the army, and they’re showing us what they do here.”Syracuse has ventured to the upstate New York military base the last four summers, advancing a partnership with the soldiers that started in 2012. Saturday was Durso’s second trip to the Carrier Dome this season — he and the soldiers came down for SU’s game against Wake Forest — but this was the first all-access weekend for the troops.The Orange (3-7, 1-5 Atlantic Coast), wearing 10th Mountain Division patches on the upper left corner of its jerseys, fell to the top-ranked Tigers (10-0, 7-0), 37-27. But observing the on-field product just scratches the surface of what Durso is trying to cultivate.“Football is important and winning and losing is important,” Durso said, “but we’re talking about building relationships here.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFriday night, Durso and the soldiers talked to the team at its 8 o’clock meeting. They helped check beds, ate breakfast with the team Saturday morning and attended player and coach meetings. They oversaw activity in the training room, locker room, joined on the bus ride to campus and attended the silent prayer in Hendricks Chapel on the team’s walk to the Carrier Dome.Before the game, soldiers led Syracuse out of the tunnel, flanking the Orange with a 10th Mountain Division flag on the right and an American flag on the left. Durso and five others lined up behind the Syracuse captains during the coin toss and shortly into the game, a message reading “2 teams, 1 mission” flashed on the jumbotron after highlights played from SU’s 2015 trip to Fort Drum.“We didn’t get the win for them so I’m disappointed about that, but we fought hard and they enjoyed every last minute of it,” SU nose tackle Kayton Samuels said. “What we do is nothing compared to what they do. All this football is just so small compared to that.”Hankey exchanged smiles with running back Jordan Fredericks near the SU bench during warmups and chatted with offensive guard Samuel Clausman during the game. Now that players aren’t crouching behind snipers or maneuvering their way through Humvees, they’re able to show off what they specialize in.And Durso, self-admittedly not worthy of offering football advice, doesn’t think the parallels between both lives are too far-fetched.“There are a lot of similarities in terms of preparation, getting yourself mentally in the right frame of mind,” Durso said. “We do the same thing in the army getting ready for missions.”After the game, Syracuse head coach Scott Shafer stood at the podium, visibly frustrated after being eliminated from automatic bowl contention.Before taking questions from the media and stressing how outside perspective can misconstrue the reality within his own locker room, it was the bigger perception — even touching on the tragedy in Paris that took place Friday night — that took precedent.“Just great men, seen a lot of ugly things,” Shafer said, “so we could sit here and talk about a football game … love those guys, love ‘em to death.”Durso was honored to see Fort Drum’s patches on Syracuse’s jerseys, especially against Clemson. He was able to marvel at his favorite team staying close with the best in the country. The loss prematurely ended Syracuse’s season in a sense, but in some ways that wasn’t the main storyline.“Knowing it’s a game and at the end of the day everybody’s going home,” Durso said, “is a great thing.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 15, 2015 at 2:43 am Contact Matt: mcschnei@syr.edu | @matt_schneidmancenter_img Related Stories Capt. Greg Durso details 4-year progression of Syracuse-Fort Drum relationshipBlum: College football meant something in Syracuse, if only for a momentRunning back George Morris capitalizes on opportunities in loss to No. 1 ClemsonSyracuse community reacts to 37-27 loss to No. 1 ClemsonFast reaction: 3 quick takeaways from Syracuse’s loss to No. 1 Clemsonlast_img read more

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Kaeli O’Connor’s power and toughness makes her a key for Syracuse’s defense

first_img Published on April 11, 2016 at 9:52 pm Contact Sam: sjfortie@syr.edu | @Sam4TR On Kaeli O’Connor’s third day in Austria competing, all because her friend’s teammate was too old for the event, she found herself pushing a teammate in a bobsled toward an icy drop she had two days to prepare for.Her job was to push the small missile hard enough that it would skitter the 870 meters of frozen track in less than 55 seconds. In her only official run ever for the Junior World Championships — she said she went to the hospital before the second run for the stomach flu she could no longer grit out — O’Connor finished 10th of 12 teams.The initial action had struck O’Connor as similar to the sled pushes she did at high school track practice. Years later, when she focused solely on lacrosse, she’d still be doing the sled pushes on recommendation from her offseason trainers.That’s because, no matter the sport, O’Connor’s game has always been about raw power.“She’s tenacious,” assistant coach Regy Thorpe said. “… Just a really strong girl.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textO’Connor’s brief foray into bobsled didn’t last, and now the junior defender is a key piece in the Syracuse (11-3, 4-1 Atlantic Coast) defense that’s kickstarted a four-game win streak. Her toughness has helped Syracuse control its games in the midfield and not allow opponent’s second chances, whether via her 11 caused turnovers or 21 groundballs, both of which are second best on the team. It’s especially important for the Orange to maintain its advantage of grabbing 52 percent of available groundballs because SU forces the same amount of turnovers as opponents and turns the ball over more.“I always box out first,” O’Connor said of the key to getting a groundball, her specialty. “As soon as the ball hits the ground, you have to commit. If you hesitate for even a second, someone else is getting it.”The aggression led to too many fouls early in the year, Thorpe said. But now she’s putting herself in better positions defensively to pick up groundballs cleanly, which is “a huge asset” because it allows the offense — ninth in the nation with 13.79 goals per game — more time to work.The key to groundballs, players said, is boxing out to get a clean scoop at the ball, and O’Connor, at 5-foot-4, is one of the shortest defenders on the team and has that leverage. Both Thorpe and defender Brenna Rainone said both described her as “relentless.”“She’s just very tough on the field with other teams,” fellow defender Brenna Rainone said. “… She’s really fun to play with.”Two years ago in Maryland during a fall ball scrimmage, Thorpe noticed one of his players taking it upon herself to collect every groundball and clear it. Again and again, she picked it up and carried it out of the zone.“’Wow,’” Thorpe said to himself. “She was probably a little lower on the depth chart (then), but then she sprung out of nowhere carrying it up.”In the two years since, O’Connor has started every game. But now the coaching staff is asking O’Connor to not just clear, but attack past riders and potentially dish out man-up assists. She said she’s still uncomfortable doing it, especially in close games, and isn’t concentrating on offense.That’s just how O’Connor, the daughter of two collegiate lacrosse players, grew up. She began playing defense young and never practiced shooting, opting for drills in stick skills and groundballs. Her two rough-housing brothers taught her to be rugged. She played football with them in middle school. The first word that comes to her mind when describing her style of play is “aggressive.”“My mindset is I get (the groundballs) or I foul,” O’Connor said. “The 50-50 balls are the ones I like going for, and the ones I have to get it.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more