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Planners put out-of-town offices under threat

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Solitaire men create tax-free resi option

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Jamie Redknapp on why Mikel Arteta picks Eddie Nketiah up front over Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang

first_img Metro Sport ReporterThursday 25 Jun 2020 7:19 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link5.6kShares Jamie Redknapp on why Mikel Arteta picks Eddie Nketiah up front over Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang Advertisement Nketiah started through the middle on Thursday night (Picture: Getty)Jamie Redknapp believes Mikel Arteta is picking Eddie Nketiah ahead of Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang up front for Arsenal because of his impressive workrate and compared the more experienced striker’s struggles to make the centre-forward spot his own to Sergio Aguero under Pep Guardiola. Guardiola, the Manchester City manager, often used to give Gabriel Jesus game time ahead of Aguero in his early days at the Etihad, but while there is still an element of rotation now, it’s clear that Aguero has become the main man once more. Redknapp believes it took Aguero time to ‘buy into’ Guardiola’s hard-working philosophy, where strikers chase down lost causes. AdvertisementAdvertisementArteta, who used to work under Guardiola at City, is in a similar predicament. ADVERTISEMENTWith Aubameyang’s future unclear, he has favoured Nketiah through the middle – using the Gabon international in a wide left role. And Redknapp thinks that Nketiah’s ability to press from the front – which led to his opener against Southampton following an error from goalkeeper Alex McCarthy – has seen him get the nod ahead of Aubameyang and Alexandre Lacazette – who was left on the bench. Aubameyang has been forced out wide (Picture: Getty)Redknppp told Sky Sports: ‘Work from the front, chase things down… It took a little while for Aguero to buy into it and I don’t know if Aubameyang at this age will be that striker still, especially if he doesn’t want to be at the club and he wants to go. ‘He thinks with Nketiah – he works hard for the team. It’s a midfielder’s dream, it’s a defender’s dream, when someone is just pickpocketing balls around the pitch and winning balls back. It’s fantastic. More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘And he gets his reward. It’s not good goalkeeping, it’s not good from the defender as well. ‘But a lot of strikers would just leave it, they wouldn’t bother chasing lost causes, he did it and deserved that goal for that reason.’MORE: Kieran Tierney reveals how Arsenal players reacted to their dismal defeat at BrightonMORE: Claudio Bravo speaks out on his future amid Arsenal transfer interestFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Comment Advertisementlast_img read more

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Want To Self-Publish A Book? Guy Kawasaki Wants To Help

first_imgIf you’ve ever dreamed of becoming a published author, you could hardly have picked a better time to be alive. A full-blown revolution is afoot in the way books are written, published and distributed, and the playing field has practically been nuked. It makes for some feel-good, tech-democratizes-all type stuff, but just because the playing field is level doesn’t mean it’s easy to navigate. Guy Kawasaki wants to help. The entrepreneur and former Apple evangelist has published books using both the traditional and DIY routes, so he’s familiar with the inner workings of both. He recently coauthored a book titled APE (Author, Publisher and Entrepreneur): How to Publish a Book, which is being released through Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing program. (He’ll be talking about his book at a ReadWrite Mix event in San Francisco this week.) 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… john paul titlow Related Posts 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App Tags:#Amazon#books#E-Books#ibooks author#publishing APE aims to be a sort of field guide for self-publishers, surveying the current landscape and laying out recommended tools for writing, publishing and selling a book. As the title suggests, Kawasaki advocates an approach that requires wearing all three hats: not just of a writer, but as a publisher and businessperson as well. Doing so, says Kawasaki, is the only way the DIY set can begin to compete with traditional publishers. After all, it’s still big publishing companies that sell most of the books and have the advantage when it comes to professional editing, distribution and marketing. Self-publishing platforms like Amazon’s are beginning to chisel away at that dominance, but it’s really the proliferation of tablets and e-readers that’s fueling this shift. The Explosion of Tablets and E-Readers“You can get a tablet for a hundred or two hundred bucks now,” Kawasaki says. “It has so many advantages over trying to buy stacks of books. When you walk onto an airplane, even in coach, everybody’s reading a tablet now.” Apple is well on its way toward selling its 100 millionth iPad (if it hasn’t already) and it’s now joined in the tablet arena by the likes of Amazon’s Kindle Fire, the Nexus 7, Barnes and Noble’s Nook and the brand new Microsoft Surface. Then there’s the whole category of e-readers, a pack which Amazon’s line of non-tablet Kindles leads (even if they’re not forthcoming about the numbers).  As this list of players grows, there’s a seemingly corresponding drop in prices, which further fuels their adoption by consumers. The more of these gadgets land in consumers hands, the most e-books they buy. Indeed, during the first quarter of this year, digital book sales revenue surpassed that of hard covers for the first time ever.Self-Publishing Is Easier Than Ever – But Still HardFinding and buying books may be easier than at any point in human history, but publishing those books isn’t quite as simple as tapping the purchase button. There’s a cobweb of platforms, tools, formats and strategies, a path which Kawasaki and Welch attempt to illuminate. With authoring tools like Adobe InDesign and Apple’s iBooks Author, the act of publishing is getting far more user-friendly.But for self-publishers, writing the book is the easy part. Where much of the hardest works comes into play is with editing, distribution and marketing – you know, all the things a traditional publisher typically cares of. That is, if you can manage to get a book deal. “It is just a stark reality that if you’re a self-published author, you are responsible for your own marketing,” says Kawasaki, who acknowledges that established authors like himself and Tim Ferriss have a unique advantage on this front. Not every self-published author will make six figures, or even make a living from their writing at all, but the opportunity they have to give it a shot is one that never existed before. The entrepreneurial skills self-publishers need to hone can go a long way for authors using the traditional method, Kawsaki adds. That’s because big publishing houses only put a limited amount of time and effort into marketing a new book before moving on push the next one. “Even if you’re with the best publisher in the world, it always helps to have your own platform,” he says. That’s something self-published authors will have to work very hard to build. With self-publishing, the trade-off is clear: Sure, it’s easier and more democratic, while authors have more freedom and they earn more money per book. But selling those books is much harder without the backing of a traditional publisher and the whole process requires much more of the author than just sitting down and writing. It’s a concept Kawasaki refers to “artisanal publishing,” wherein the creators play a more hands-on role throughout the process of crafting and selling the product. In other words, it’s more work.  5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more