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England 22 Scotland 16 – The Rugby World Player Ratings

first_imgLONDON, ENGLAND – MARCH 13: Max Evans of Scotland beats James Haskell of England to score their first try during the RBS 6 Nations Championship match between England and Scotland at Twickenham Stadium on March 13, 2011 in London, England. (Photo by Richard Heathcote/Getty Images) Ruaridh Jackson 68 Much improved from his performance against Ireland and well-taken drop-goal.Rory Lawson 70 A tidy contribution from the scrum-half – should hold off the challenge of Mike Blair.Allan Jacobsen 64 Under pressure at scrum but put in a decent shift in defence.Ross Ford 64 Too often went for long throw at lineout and that put his side under pressure at times.Moray Low 58 Taken off early in second half after being so outplayed at the scrum.Richie Gray 72 Again one of Scotland’s best performers – a presence in the tight and the loose.Al Kellock 68 Lineout wasn’t as strong as it has been but still a hard-working display from the captain.Nathan Hines 67 Gave away a couple of silly penalties but tackled well – and talked to ref in French!John Barclay 59 England scored decisive try when he was in the sin-bin for a cynical offence.Kelly Brown 70 Great work on the floor and in defence before being carried off on a stretcher.Replacements Richie Vernon looked good with ball in hand and Dan Parks tried to keep England pinned in their own half.THE KEY0 – Should never play for this team again10 – Shocker – lucky to get picked again this season20 – Out of his depth30 – Did one or two things right – must improve40 – Willing but woeful50 – Minimum requirement for  a professional – average60 – Solid effort and a decent performance70 – Made key contributions and guaranteed his place for next time80 – Superb – should give himself a pat on the back Winning return: Tom Croft marks his England comeback by scoring a tryENGLAND REMAIN on course for a Six Nations Grand Slam following their 22-16 win over Scotland at Twickenham, but it was far from the convincing display many expected. It was an error-strewn game that never really sparked into life. In fact, the crowd seemed more entertained by the fox on the pitch before kick-off and referee Romain Poite having to leave the field injured. So who’s guaranteed their place for next time and who’s at risk of the drop?ENGLANDBen Foden 73 Joined the line well in attack and made several decent breaks. A big threat.Chris Ashton 71 Kept relatively quiet by the Scottish defence but still made few breaks and good offloads.Mike Tindall 62 Outshined by Matt Banahan’s display when he had to go off injured at half-time.Shontayne Hape 70 One of his best attacking performances for England and handled himself well in defence.Mark Cueto 72 Probably got more chance to run than Ashton and proved it’s not all about young bucks.Toby Flood 68 Not at his best. Gave away silly penalty in good attacking position but distributed well.Ben Youngs 67 Another not to hit top form. Has pace and an eye for a gap but can leave himself isolated.Alex Corbisiero 72 Could be more switched on, but dominated in scrum and looks comfortable at Test level.Dylan Hartley 66 Not his usual rampaging best in loose and can be guilty of loitering out wide.Full steam ahead: James Haskell on the chargeDan Cole 72 Easily got better of Allan Jacobsen at scrum time and even stole a lineout.Louis Deacon 70 Good work-rate around the park, be it as tackler, lineout forward or carrier.Tom Palmer 72 Another impressive display. Quick reactions and solid in defence.Tom Wood 64 Could find himself usurped by Tom Croft for next week – needs to do more around field.James Haskell 76 Easily England’s best performer – made yards in attack and offered plenty of go-forward.Nick Easter 70 Strong in the driving maul, few good breaks and showed deft hands at times.Replacements Matt Banahan showed power, pace and good hands in centre and Tom Croft took his try well.SCOTLANDChris Paterson 73 Made two try-saving tackles, kicked well and enjoyed a couple of nice jinking runs.Simon Danielli 56 Offered a few glimpses of ability in first half but went missing in the second.Joe Ansbro 62 Good defensively but little to write home about as an attacking threat.Sean Lamont 68 Broke the line a couple of times early on but another who’s performance dipped.Touch down: Max Evans scores a well-executed individual try for ScotlandMax Evans 71 Executed his try well but occasionally guilty of being too selfish on the ball. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 90 – A personal best – his greatest game ever100 – Faultless – no one could play a better game in this positionlast_img read more

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Is this the last we’ll see of Tom Youngs in an England shirt?

first_img TAGS: HighlightLeicester Tigers By Adam HathawayEddie Jones has finally got his feet under the desk at Twickenham and don’t Tom Youngs and a few others know about it and that Fast Eddie is the man in charge?When Jones breezed into the Twickenham media room, an hour after announcing his first squad on Wednesday, ahead of the Six Nations, he was his usual wise-cracking self and the one-liners flowed. It is doubtful whether the Leicester hooker Youngs, and a few others, saw the joke but it gave us a clue to where Jones’ priorities lie.He was not the only casualty, as Jones left plenty of blood on the floor pumping from the veins of some of Stuart Lancaster’s most highly-regarded lieutenants, and some may never see HQ in a white jersey again.In-form: Tom Youngs has performed well for Leicester Tigers this seasonA few of the droppings were predictable enough but no-one saw the omission of Youngs coming in the acres of newsprint previewing the unveiling of New England. Maybe we should have.When Jones pitched up before Christmas he told us he wanted his hookers to hook the ball and he has been true to his word.On Saturday after the Tigers last-gasp win against Northampton an in-form Youngs chatted to the press and did not look like a bloke who had been told his neck was on the line and he was more than likely to be on Leicester duty than at Murrayfield on the first weekend in February.Data taken from ESPN shows Youngs’ effectiveness in 2015As Charlie Morgan has explained elsewhere on rugbyworld.com Jones is a fan of getting the ball out of the scrum quickly, as Japan did at the World Cup when they could have been out-muscled, and it looks like he is going the same way with England.Youngs was a popular member of the England squadYoungs was probably England’s best forward around the park during the World Cup, but hookers hook, and throw in well at the line-out, and anything else is just peripheral for the new head honcho at Twickers. It might not be a coincidence that Jones’ assistant Steve Borthwick is a major line-out anorak and Youngs has missed the target occasionally.Back-to-basics stuff might not have worked out for John Major but it may just do the trick for Jones, who knows that results are the only currency he will be judged on.As an old school ex-hooker himself, with Randwick and New South Wales, Jones is probably aware of Youngs’ comments a couple of years ago when he said he was struggling to get a grip on the new scrum laws. Then Youngs said he was not too keen on hooking the ball at the set-piece because it made him feel at risk.In favour: Luke Cowan-Dickie was one of the three hookers namedThen he told us: “Look, I don’t want to come across as a wimp or as someone whingeing about what went on in the past. But when blokes used to hook for the ball 15 years ago, everyone around him in the scrum was a lot lighter than they are now, probably less powerful, too. Now, you’ve got to decide to strike or not, twist your body across to get your foot to it or even just your knee. You are more vulnerable.”No-one would accuse Youngs of being a wimp. The bloke has won 28 England caps in the front row and been a Test British and Irish Lion after converting from centre after prompting from the former Leicester coach Heyneke Meyer. He is not going to get sand kicked in his face on the beach anytime soon, he just has to adapt to the desires of his new national boss. At 28, Youngs could come again but Jones obviously fancies Dylan Hartley, possibly as captain, and Jamie George and seems keen on Luke Cowan-Dickie, who was one of the first players name-checked by his predecessor four years’ ago.Jones has put his coat on the hook on the back of his office door for sure. Hookers have to hook and until Youngs cracks that we probably won’t see him in the foreseeable future running out for England.center_img Eddie Jones has nailed his colours to the mast with his selection of his hookers for the Six Nations but it is premature to write Tom Youngs out of the England picture just yet LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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CDUL take pride of place in Portugal

first_img Capital class: Lisbon side CDUL celebrate their play-off win in the Premiership final (Miguel Rodrigues) FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERE Another year, a new champion for both the Premiership and the national cup, new youngsters stepping into the spotlight, new legends in the making and old wolves still gnarling strongly as ever.Portuguese rugby continues on its own path, with the majority of the Premiership players being amateur and a very small number deservedly having professional status. Many of the pros are foreign, such as Hamish Graham (CDUL), José Rodrigues and PJ van Zyl (AIS Agronomia), Sam Henwood (AEIS Técnico), Jared Page (GDS Cascais), Ethan Matthews (RC Lousã) and Talalelei Moli (RC Montemor).GD Direito, CDUP and Acádemica AC didn’t sign any non-Portuguese players.In the Premiership, CDUL were crowned champions and it was an unexpected triumph. It wasn’t the best season for the side known as Universitários as they finished in third place, which forced them to sweat in the play-offs and survive a tight encounter against former champions GD Direito on their own turf.The top six go through a knockout stage, with the first play-offs pairing 3 v 6 and 4 v 5. CDUL defeated Técnico 46-15 to move into the semis.Aussie coach Jack Ferrer, the former head coach of Sydney University, prepared his team well enough to survive and win against Direito’s Pedro Leal, Vasco Uva and Gonçalo Uva.Clean ball: CDUL win a lineout during the Premiership final against Agronomia (Miguel Rodrigues)In the final they met the best team of the season, AIS Agronomia. Led by former international player and national coach Frederico de Sousa, they had finished the regular season top of the table.For Agronomia it was quite a revolution because they had finished fifth last year and didn’t make it past the first play-off. In the semis they had to face Tomaz Morais’s GDS Cascais and after some nail biting, Agronomia marched on to the final, winning 17-13.The CDUL v Agronomia match had all of the components of a classic: full stands, try-saving tackles, outstanding line breaks and a late try that gave the final twist for CDUL’s epic comeback. The final score was 25-21.The Universitários looked down and out when trailing 16-5 at half-time but their belief never wavered and, in the 80th minute, Jorge Abecassis escaped from a tackle to jump uncontested to the try-line. The whistle was blown and CDUL had earned their 20th national title in the most dramatic style.Another restructureRC Lousã propped up the table, with RC Montemor one place above. But there was no official relegation battle as the Premiership will again go through alterations.In 2017-18 there will be 12 teams, divided into three pools of four. The top two in each group will advance to a pool that will decide the new champions. And the bottom six will play to avoid relegation, in a battle that will have to end with five teams getting demoted to the second tier of Portuguese rugby. Francisco Isaac reviews the ups and downs of the 2016-17 Portuguese season, which saw CDUL lift their 20th Premiership title and AIS Agronomia scoop a cup double Mascarenhas grabbed Morais’s attention and quickly saw his name in the first team. The hooker is a modern type of forward, combining strength and agility.The South African with a Portuguese heartJosé Rodrigues deserves to get the MVP of the season. The fly-half, born in South Africa but with Portuguese blood, was one of the key players who inspired AIS Agronomia to achieve first place in the regular season and win both the Super Cup and Portuguese Cup.Still waiting for his Portuguese passport so he can help the national team, he scored six tries and kicked 234 points. An incisive offensive player, with a set of skills that can change the course of the game, Rodrigues can tackle as well as a flanker, something natural for any South African player.Hungry wolfPedro Leal was one of the field bosses of GD Direito in the 2016-17 season. Yes, it wasn’t a good year for the Advogados as they didn’t win a trophy or get to the final of the Premiership, but Leal still had some tricks up his sleeve.Master: Pedro Leal, here at last year’s Figueira Beach Rugby event, starred for Direito (Luis Cabelo)Playing as a scrum-half, the sevens legend managed to shake up his team in some big games and never failed to deliver his very best.If in 2015-16 GD Direito won every Portuguese and Iberian title, 2016-17 was the complete opposite. However, the former Portuguese champions have one of the best rugby schools in Portugal and they don’t need to be worried about the future. Francisco Bruno, João Vital, Bruno Moreira, Vasco Mendes and others will be new power drivers for the club.Captain KikoFrancisco ‘Kiko’ Magalhães, Portugal’s captain and one of CDUL’s leaders, cemented his reputation as an intense and fearless leader. Only a great skipper could help his team come out from an underachieving year to go through the knockout stage and win the final at the last breath.Iconic: CDUL scrum-half Francisco Magalhaes, Portugal’s captain, was inspirational (Luis Cabelo)A good tackler, dynamic attacker and excellent commanding chief, he has to be recognised as one of the new legends of Portuguese rugby.Frederico’s dream start You could argue that Jack Farrer (CDUL) or Tomaz Morais (GDS Cascais) deserve to be listed as the Manager of the Season. But this accolade has to go to Frederico de Sousa because the facts are emphatic: Agronomia bounced back from a disappointing season to win the Super Cup against GD Direito; they secured first place by winning 15 of their 18 games in the regular season; they reached the Premiership final and won the Portuguese Cup.Agronomia won 21 out of 25 games, showed good execution in the back-line, dominance in the forwards and excellent teamwork. De Sousa mustered the players, recovered their fighting spirit and won two trophies in his first season as Agronomia coach.Nagging questionsFew believed that the Clube Futebol ‘Os Belenenses’ could mount a serious title race or even reach the knockout stage this year. Nonetheless, João Uva (former Portuguese International) and João Mirra’s team had one of the best winning streaks with eight victories and one draw in the last nine games, before it ended in the play-offs against GDS Cascais.Sprinkled with some of the best players in the Premiership, such as Duarte Moreira, Bernardo Cardoso and Tomás Sequeira, Belenenses can do much more and become once again one of the top teams in Portugal.Growing force: Belenenses showed what they can do in a late unbeaten run (Miguel Rodrigues)As for Académica AC there’s a long way to go but if the Pretos play the right cards they can be a serious team in two or three years’ time. A young team captained by the 23-year-old Francisco Bessa and coached by ex-Portugal head coach João Luís, they play a quick and attractive type of rugby.center_img As for the Portuguese Cup, AIS Agronomia had a second opportunity to win silverware when facing Morais’s team, GDS Cascais. Cascais beat CDUL, GD Direito and Técnico to reach the final, with an interesting combination of youngsters (António Vidinha and Duarte Costa Campos) and Portuguese legends (Diogo Mateus, a former Munster player).Agronomia learned from their mistakes in the Premiership final and pulled through to take the Portuguese Cup for the tenth time. Cascais had several chances to match the score, but neither Page nor Franco Correa could put the ball through the posts on four occasions.Cup champions: Agronomia made amends by winning their tenth Portuguese Cup (Jose Vergueiro)AIS Agronomia dominated in the scrum and lineout, were cooler under pressure and remained resolute, emerging 16-8 winners. Fernando Almeida and José Rodrigues (all 16 points came from the fly-half) were the standouts on a proud day for the Agrónomo fans.As for the second-tier Portuguese Championship, SL Benfica and CR Évora won the right to be among the best teams in Portugal, after winning the semi-finals against CR Bairrada (one of the most promising rugby projects in Portugal) and CRAV. The final between both already promoted teams was a joy to watch, with Benfica taking the spoils 19-17.A star is bornVasco Ribeiro, a 19-year-old centre, was a force to be reckoned with. In the past two seasons the Agronomia player has won a starting place for his club, played in the Sevens World Series, started five of the last eight Portugal Tests and won the U20 European Championship in Romania.One to watch: teenager Agronomia’s Vasco Ribeiro had a super campaign (Jose Vergueiro)One of the strongest ball-carriers and tacklers in Portuguese rugby, Ribeiro is on his way to becoming one of the best Portuguese players of the era.Jorge Abecassis and Nuno Mascarenhas deserve to be praised for their growth. Abecassis, the CDUL full-back, scored all of the Universitários points in the Premiership final (two tries and five penalties), mixing speed and techniques that almost replicates Nuno Sousa Guedes, the sevens International famed for scoring an equalizer against New Zealand in 2015. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Manuel Eusébio Picão is one of the up-and-comers who has established himself as one of the best forwards in Portugal. They need to sort out some problems – players living in Lisbon and not training with the team is one of them – before they can become one of the top contenders for either the national cup or the Premiership.Portuguese rugby now takes a breather, waiting for the sevens national tournaments and the Beach Rugby Series that will happen in June and July. The 15s season will resume in September with Farrer’s CDUL facing Agronomia in the Super Cup, opening another exciting chapter in Portuguese rugby.last_img read more

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Autumn Internationals: Talking points from week three

first_img England and Ireland may have registered 100% records in the November Internationals, but Scotland have most cause for celebration. We look at the major talking points from week three, which left just one match remaining for the home unions this autumn – Wales v South Africa.Scotland 53-24 Australia * Murrayfield was rocking as Scotland inflicted the heaviest-ever defeat on Australia by a northern hemisphere side. Not since France put them to the sword in 1976, with a six-try 34-6 rout, have the Wallabies been so chastened.Excluding a big 1990 win against the Pumas, when Argentinian rugby was a far cry from today’s professional model, this was also Scotland’s biggest victory against one of the ‘big four’ from the southern hemisphere.* It was achieved despite the absence of several leading players, including Richie Gray, Ross Ford, WP Nel, Greig Laidlaw, Alex Dunbar and, most tellingly, Stuart Hogg, whose distress was plain to see when he withdrew just before the match with a hip injury.Scotland have been forced to dig deep into their resources, particularly in the front row where Darryl Marfo, Jamie Bhatti and George Turner have all made their Test debut this month, and their squad depth has largely stood up to scrutiny.Watching brief: Stuart Hogg cheers Scotland on from the sidelines after his pre-match injury (Getty)* Sixteen tries this month tell only part of the story. Scotland’s high tempo and adventure has been a joy to watch, and it took only three minutes for Finn Russell to set the tone with a quick drop-out. The try by Huw Jones, after Russell feigned a kick to the corner and instead tapped the ball and shifted it the other way, is classic Gregor Townsend mentality and it’s what fans love to see.* There was no need for Michael Cheika to hide his face as he was filmed entering Murrayfield, but well done the coach for allowing Stephen Moore to start on his 129th and final Test appearance for Australia.Moore’s first start in the Wallaby No 2 jersey had been at Murrayfield 11 years ago and he has been a magnificent servant to the game. Only six men have played more Test matches than the quietly spoken hooker and it’s rather sad that the 34-year-old’s final appearance should end in such a shocking reverse.* What was Sekope Kepu thinking? He’s one of the leading props in world rugby but he had a moment of madness when he smashed recklessly into Hamish Watson’s head at a ruck just before half-time and earned an inevitable red card.Kepu became the fifth Wallaby to be sent off in history but the first Aussie forward to suffer such a fate in the pro era. His team led at that stage but found the burden of playing a man light for 41 minutes far too much to bear.Seeing red: Wallaby Sekope Kepu is sent off for a dangerous challenge on Hamish Watson (Getty)* Hogg’s withdrawal meant Byron McGuigan enjoyed a first start for Scotland after coming off the bench for his debut last week.The Sale man seized his chance gloriously, scoring the game’s opening try after two well-placed kick-ons and one ugly-looking one off his shin that threatened to spoil his big moment.The scoring pass for his second try was given to him by stand-in full-back Sean Maitland, whose Six Nations starting place must now be under threat from McGuigan.* Scotland’s driving maul has come on in leaps and bounds and their ruck work was hailed as the world’s best by Wallaby assistant coach Stephen Larkham on Saturday. The biggest concern will be the leaking of 12 tries this month, with the Wallabies crossing four times despite being utterly outclassed.Occasional lapses, such as the Bernard Foley restart that Tommy Seymour allowed to bounce into the corner, also need to be eradicated if Scotland are to topple other heavyweights.Coach’s verdict: “We get the energy from the crowd and BT Murrayfield the last two weeks has been fantastic. It’s the best atmosphere in the international game just now and it’s great for our players to experience that and thrive off that.” Gregor TownsendScotland’s autumn score: 9 out of 10.Scotland haven’t won the Five/Six Nations title since 1999 and are 11-1 outsiders to break that run, but they have to be regarded as genuine contenders given their autumn form. They came close to a clean sweep this month and have played with electrifying brio.Scotland 44-38 SamoaScotland 17-22 New ZealandScotland 53-24 AustraliaDaly Express: Elliot Daly scores his second try against Samoa after a long angled run (Getty)England 48-14 Samoa * Even an experimental England side was always going to be too strong for the world’s 16th-ranked team.Tries by Mike Brown and Alex Lozowski in the first ten minutes set England on their way to their highest points tally against Samoa in their eight meetings, surpassing the 44 points scored by Jack Rowell’s team at the 1995 World Cup.* Once again England saw a TMO review go in their favour, with Danny Care adjudged not to have knocked the ball on in the build-up to Brown’s second-minute try.Just like last week’s trio of incidents against Australia, it was the correct call, so let’s not hear any talk about ‘controversial’ decisions! Officials are looking for ‘clear and obvious’ infringements and where none exist, as occurred when the ball hit Care’s waist and knee but not seemingly his hand, then the try should stand.* Joe Launchbury’s early departure with injury accentuated the problems England incurred at the breakdown. Eddie Jones’s men conceded 20 turnovers and a number of penalties at the tackle situation, with Samoa putting in more numbers and driving England off the ball.The result was a lack of fluency and slow ball for the backs to work with.“Samoa contested hard at the breakdown, the referee allowed the contest, and our second man was a bit slow,” said Jones. “Up to this game it’s been good.”Riding the tackle: No 8 Sam Simmonds carried strongly on his first England start (Getty Images)* It’s not being wise after the event to predict that this might happen. England have a wealth of back-row talent but not a jackal master in the mould of Sam Cane, Hamish Watson or Sam Warburton.Their back row trio of Maro Itoje, Chris Robshaw and Sam Simmonds brought plenty to the party, with Simmonds being name-checked by Jones in the flash interview. The Exeter No 8 may yet become a terrific ball-snaffling seven but for now he’s first and foremost a quick and powerful carrier, in similar vein to Ireland seven Sean O’Brien.* England are trying to broaden their kicking game and their second try illustrated that. Instead of a box kick by the nine, George Ford was allowed to launch an up and under that Tim Nanai-Williams failed to gather.Elliot Daly swopped and Jamie George put Lozowksi over for the try.Plenty to work on: Eddie Jones watches on during the Old Mutual Wealth Series match (Getty)* There’s only so much Jones can learn from a fixture of this nature. Samoa impressed but the fact they included a player, JJ Taulagi, from the Newton Abbot club in their squad indicates the gulf between these sides.What would be lovely to see, following five clashes with Samoa at Twickenham and three more on neutral soil at World Cups, is an England team playing in Apia.Coach’s verdict: “It was a bit of a muddling performance. We started well but probably got seduced by the perceived easiness of the game. We have a hell of a lot of work to do. We don’t have the consistency of doing the small things right. We’ve got two years to get that right.” Eddie JonesEngland’s autumn score: 6 out of 10.England won their autumn Tests by comfortable margins but none of their performances were really up to scratch. At least, not by the standards that we now judge them. Nevertheless, Eddie Jones’s 96% win success is not to be sniffed at! Wales 21-29 AustraliaWales 13-6 GeorgiaWales 18-33 New ZealandWales v South Africa, 2 DecTop dogs: TJ Perenara leads the haka for a Kiwi side that has an 89% win success under Steve Hansen LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Finishing touch: Stuart McInally scores Scotland’s eighth try against the Wallabies in their record romp England, Scotland and Ireland saw off southern hemisphere opponents in their final autumn Test, but defeated Wales still have work to do. We look at the talking points TAGS: Highlight England 21-8 ArgentinaEngland 30-6 AustraliaEngland 48-14 SamoaStreak of gold: Jacob Stockdale scores against Argentina as Ireland rack up yet another win (Inpho)Ireland 28-19 Argentina* Ireland’s seventh straight win since losing in Cardiff last March created another pleasing stat for the men in green – they have beaten every other Tier One country in the past two years.This victory was never in doubt once Jacob Stockdale put Ireland 20 points clear at the start of the second half, but the Pumas rallied with three tries in the final 25 minutes.* Jacob Stockdale was named Man of the Match by the host broadcaster and at 21 looks set for a huge future. He scored two of Ireland’s three tries, racing on to Johnny Sexton passes, and is improving rapidly as a defender.There’s talk of him moving into the 15 shirt filled here by Rob Kearney but that would be a mistake. Kearney, 31, still has loads to offer and Stockdale is revelling in life on the left wing – he has eight tries in nine league and Test matches this season. Let him bed in at 11.FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERE* Not for the first time, we were treated to the classic Joe Schmidt detail in strike plays. First, Sexton’s wrap-around to take Chris Farrell’s pass and put the supporting Stockdale in under the posts.Then some typical lineout ingenuity as Argentina piled in on Devin Toner only to find he had shifted it to Iain Henderson and was setting up a long-formation drive that included powerful centre Bundee Aki, who had been stationed at the tail of the lineout. CJ Stander scored the try and what a beauty it was.Perfect execution: CJ Stander’s try followed some crafty deception at an attacking lineout (Inpho)* No Garry Ringrose, no Robbie Henshaw, no problem. The Farrell-Aki midfield partnership flourished and Ireland are developing some serious strength in depth.When as fine a player as Jack McGrath can’t get in the side – Cian Healy, back to his “man-eating best” in the words of Sky’s Mark Robson, has possession of the loosehead shirt – then you know you’re in a good place. And we haven’t even discussed the outstanding promise of 21-year-old James Ryan in the second row.* We’re seeing a lot of tries from grubber kicks at the moment and Argentina demonstrated the art twice at the Aviva Stadium.Joaquin Tuculet was deemed just onside when he dotted down Nicolas Sanchez’s grubber and Ramiro Moyano scored from Gonzalo Bertranou’s delicate kick in the final play.Thinking of you: the Pumas pay tribute to the missing crewmen of an Argentinian submarine (Inpho)Argentina have made close to 50 long-haul flights this year and no team has earned a break more than them.They’ve played 26 Tests since June 2016 and have lost the vast majority. You wonder how long they can keep it up.Coach’s verdict: “I was disappointed Argentina scored the last two tries, but the way we built our way into the game was very satisfying. One of the best things about this group is the experienced players helping the younger players through. You want people feeding off each other.” Joe SchmidtIreland’s autumn score: 8 out of 10Three wins against Top 10 opposition, with the record spanking of the Springboks a red-letter day. Ireland made 13 changes to face Fiji and almost tripped up, but normal service was resumed against the Pumas. With three successive home games in the Six Nations to follow an opening visit to shaky France, there’s reason for Irish optimism.Ireland 38-3 South AfricaIreland 23-20 FijiIreland 28-19 ArgentinaWhat a finish: Waisake Naholo scores the opening try despite the challenge of Steff Evans (Inpho)Wales 18-33 New Zealand* The margin varies but the result stays the same. Wales have now lost 30 consecutive matches to the All Blacks since their last success 64 years ago.This latest fixture effectively slipped away from Wales in the first half because, despite enjoying 73% territory and 68% possession, they contrived to go in at the break 12-11 behind. The All Blacks were bound to fire some shots at some point and so it proved.* Injuries didn’t help the Welsh cause, with Rhys Webb lasting only five minutes after a heavy fall and Jake Ball departing on 18 minutes with an arm injury that led to him receiving gas and air.However, Wales threw everything they had at New Zealand and stayed true to their new thrilling attacking vision. They made 14 offloads – twice as many as the All Blacks – and their November tally of 46 dwarfs the 26 they made during the whole of this year’s Six Nations.Black block: Sonny Bill Williams tries to stop a box kick by Wales scrum-half Gareth Davies (Inpho)* Accuracy and execution are buzzwords in rugby and the All Blacks showed again that nobody finishes like they do. Waisake Naholo’s opening try owed much to Aaron Smith’s decision to ignore the crowded Damian McKenzie and find his 14 in space on the right.Naholo got the next too as New Zealand stretched Wales left and right from a tap, Anton Lienert-Brown supported Rieko Ioane’s run for the third try and Ioane intercepted for number four.Ioane applied the killer blow from a slick set move off a left-field scrum and engaged in a spot of sledging – “look at the score” – before Wayne Barnes called time on a breathless match.Scott Williams’s try, on the occasion of his 50th cap, was every bit as impressive as Wales cut through New Zealand courtesy of Hallom Amos’s superb inners line.Keep the faith: a young Wales fan waves his flag during the defeat by the All Blacks (Getty Images)* Are the All Blacks vulnerable? That’s been the talk but they’ve come through the month unscathed to finish with 12 wins and a draw from their 15 Tests in 2017.Steve Hansen has exposed 15 or so new players to All Blacks rugby and has made do, to varying extents, without such world-class operators as Ben Smith, Brodie Retallick and Kieran Read.They’ve lost the possession and territory battles in all three November Tests and coughed up 40 penalties and four yellow cards (and how Read escaped a card at Murrayfield is beyond me).Are they vulnerable? No, not really. They’re still winning.Coach’s verdict: “Before the match I said the big challenge was to contain the pace and power of their wingers. They scored four tries between them and that was probably the difference. But the way we’re trying to play is very positive.” Warren GatlandWales’ autumn score: 6 out of 10It’s difficult to rate Wales. Two defeats and a dire performance against Georgia suggest a wretched Under Armour Series, but you have to rejoice in their eagerness to play with width and tempo. Rob Evans made 12 passes against Australia!last_img read more

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Hotshot: Newcastle and Scotland U20 back-row Guy Graham

first_img Newcastle and Scotland U20 back-row Guy Graham Date of birth 29 August 1998 Born Stirling Club Newcastle Country Scotland Position Back-rowWhen did you first play rugby? I started playing at Carlisle when I was six or seven, worked my way up through the colts and made the first team at 17. My dad and my brothers played, so I thought I may as well give it a go.Was it competitive in your family with three brothers? Definitely – everything’s a competition in this household. George is the oldest, then Gary and Greg. It was tough as the youngest but it helped me in the long run.Have you always played in the back row? No, I started as a hooker. It wasn’t until I was with the Carlisle first team that I moved to the back row. Originally I was a six and then I went to seven.Talk us through your progress… It’s got crazy this year! I was in the first team at Carlisle, then I was picked for Hawick. I played for a Borders representative side and got picked for Scotland U20 for the Six Nations and World Cup.How did you link up with Newcastle? My brother (Gary) gave me a mention! They took notice of me in the Six Nations and called me in. Dean Richards said: “What do you think of playing for us next year?” I was gobsmacked.What were you doing before the Falcons deal? He’s the latest rising rugby star from the Graham family – meet back-row Guy I worked in construction. I’m a groundworker by trade. I started an apprenticeship after school and have been doing it ever since. It means I appreciate it that little bit more and it’ll be different playing rugby week in, week out.What are your strengths? The basics – turnovers, ball-carrying and running hard.Who’s been the biggest influence on your career? My dad, who was capped for Scotland, and Gary, when you look at what he’s achieved in such a short time.So is it England or Scotland for you? I don’t know to be fair, I’ll see what comes. Scotland is my first choice but if England comes up before then…We’re all passionate Scots but it’s a huge achievement to get in the England squad (as Gary did last season), so we’re proud of him.Who were your childhood heroes? Probably my dad. Obviously he played a bit before I could watch, but in the house there were caps everywhere and he’d talk about his memories. It was an inspiration.RW VERDICT: A great pedigree, with dad George a former Scotland prop and brother Gary standing out for Newcastle. Having Gary at Falcons will help Guy settle into pro rugby and he’s hoping to push for game time in the Premiership. Power surge: Guy Graham looks to make ground for Scotland U20 (Inpho) TAGS: Newcastle Falcons LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS This article originally appeared in the October 2018 edition of Rugby World.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

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General Convention: Speaking up, in big and small ways, about…

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID July 7, 2015 at 10:44 pm How do I avoid racial profiling? Richard Gatjens says: Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC General Convention 2015, July 8, 2015 at 9:36 am As a member of the Anti-Racism Committee of the Episcopal Diocese of New York, it’s nice to see attention being paid to the issue again by the national church. We’ve seen funding and committees come and go, however, and I hope that this time the Church will stick to its commitment. It’s an issue we all need to become involved in. General Convention, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Music Morristown, NJ July 7, 2015 at 6:24 pm It’s depressing to hear the stories of continued discrimination practiced by unconscious white supremacists; but it’s reassuring to see DFMS facilitating this dialogue once again at General Convention after it diminished immensely following 2009 defunding of antiracism training. The new funding for racial justice & reconciliation holds promise that Bishop Curry’s election was more than an image stunt. It’s also reassuring to see the work of Atlanta and Southern Virginia dioceses highlighted; may it greatly expand! Thanks to Rev. Pat McCaughan and ENS for this excellent report. Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Comments (3) Rector Shreveport, LA General Convention: Speaking up, in big and small ways, about race Pop-up conversations offered safe places for sharing The Rev. Myra Garnes Shuler, introducing the young adult speakers at the Acts8Moment gathering. Photo: Lynn A. Collins[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] With the nation’s racial tensions boiling, the 78th General Convention of The Episcopal Church has spoken in a big way about its priorities, earmarking $2 million for racial justice and reconciliation work in the next triennium.The initiative involves “new money” and unrestricted funds and sends a strong hopeful message, according to Diane Pollard, a New York lay deputy and co-chair of General Convention’s Legislative Committee on Social Justice and United States Policy. The committee oversaw the bulk of resolutions involving racial justice and reconciliation efforts, including: A011, A182, A183, C019, and D044.During a July 2 budget debate Sam Gould, a Massachusetts deputy and a member of General Convention’s Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F), said that as a teenager he was the “New England prep school-attending white boy of my church’s primarily black and Latino youth group” in a town with one of the highest rates of gang activity in that state.“Over the years my eyes have been opened by watching my friends. Their public schools did not educate them. Their police do not make them safe. More have gone to prison than have graduated from college. These are not statistics; these are my friends.”“I used to view their reality as that of a glass ceiling they were trying to break through. I believe a more apt metaphor would be that they are trying to break up through the floor, the floor I have been invited to stand on because of the color of my skin. If we continue to look at racial justice as a black issue, we will fail… If we pat ourselves on the back after this convention and say ‘job well done,’ we will fail.”The Rev. Mally Lloyd of Massachusetts, PB&F chair, told Episcopal News Service that given the current racially charged atmosphere in the United States, the shootings and the plight of African-Americans, the committee wanted to do more in earmarking $2 million for racial justice and reconciliation and offering a blank slate for the church to be able to try something new.The $2 million will come from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s short-term reserves and is part of the $4.7 million surplus with which the 2013-2015 triennium is predicted to end.“We’re seeing this as an extraordinary circumstance and an extraordinary opportunity and, therefore, using extraordinary means to support it,” Diocese of Maine Bishop Stephen Lane, PB&F vice chair, told ENS.Pollard acknowledged the nation’s racially charged context, noting that as convention has met in Salt Lake City, seven predominantly black Southern churches have had suspicious fires. In the months before convention, police-involved shootings of unarmed African-American men, and the June 17 murders of nine black churchgoers during an Emanuel AME Church Bible study in Charleston, South Carolina, by a self-described white supremacist, have intensified racial unrest.“We are where we are,” Pollard said July 1, of the nation’s racial ills. But she believes the work of convention can refocus efforts for reconciliation.Gould agreed: “As a member of PB&F, I am proud of this budget and the bold statement it makes. However, it must be seen as the start of a movement Jesus is calling us into. The movement for racial justice and reconciliation, that is what every Episcopalian must engage in. Now, we know that only together and with God is change possible.”Pollard said the committee’s racial justice resolutions “inform and support each other” and are pieces of a larger whole.“Our church has this great opportunity to build on what has happened … and if we’re honest about it, all we can say is, ‘Are we going to answer the call?’ I think we are, but we’re also human beings and we’re frail, too.“I’ve been in this struggle for a long time,” she added. “It’s not something that I’m ever going to give up. This is a time of opportunity in the church.”The time is now: ‘Pieces of a larger whole’Pollard and others say the landslide election of North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry as 27th presiding bishop of The Episcopal Church also speaks in a big way about the church’s priorities and dreams. Curry, who will begin his nine-year term Nov. 1 as the first African-American presiding bishop, has said reconciliation and evangelism are mainstays of his ministry.He joined with hundreds of bishops and other convention-goers during a June 28 anti-gun-violence procession to witness, worship and walk through the streets of Salt Lake City. The goal was to build common ground and “bring an end to violence, because black lives matter, brown lives matter, all lives matter,” he said.Curry challenged marchers to: “Go forth, go forth, go forth into this world and proclaim that love is the only way. Go forth and proclaim that we will end the scourge of violence, we will make poverty history, and we will end racism, because we all got one God who created us and we are all children of that one God, and we are brothers and sisters one of another, and all lives matter.”Annette Buchanan, Union of Black Episcopalians’ president, addresses the participants of the July 1 Acts8Moment gathering. Photo: Lynn A. CollinsMany, including Union of Black Episcopalians‘ President Annette Buchanan, believe that Curry’s election signals an era of reconciliation and deep listening and cooperation within the church.“Part of what we are all committed to in The Episcopal Church is having a conversation about racial justice and social justice,” Buchanan said at an evening conversation co-sponsored by the Union of Black Episcopalians and the Acts8Moment July 1 at the Hilton Hotel in Salt Lake City.“One of the things that we have found, as we hear more every day about all these atrocities, is that we’re starting to get numb. We can’t handle it any more; it’s too much,” she told the gathering.But, while visiting churches, she realized that “no one was having this conversation. It was like a dissonance; the world was going crazy. But many of us were not having those conversations in our coffee hours. We were not hearing about it in our sermons, there was no opportunity for dialogue.”Education, training, actionChuck Wynder, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s missioner for social justice and advocacy engagement, said racial reconciliation when combined with social justice opens up amazing spaces for transformation, to be lived out not only in church but also in the community. He cited as examples the Diocese of Atlanta’s Beloved Community Commission and the Diocese of Southern Virginia’s “Repairing the Breach.”“We have to recognize that without justice-making, there is no reconciliation; that justice-making is naming and speaking truth,” he said.Emily Shelton, from the Diocese of Virginia and a member of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship Young Adults, said she got involved in racial justice efforts after University of Virginia student Martese Johnson, who is African-American, was beaten right outside her front door by Alcoholic Beverage Control agents.“Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, Michael Brown – they were just names to me until one day it came to my front door,” she told the General Convention’s Legislative Committee on Social Justice and United States Policy. “God is sounding the alarm but we keep hitting the snooze button. It’s time for the church to wake up.”The Rev. Kurt Gearhart, a Washington, D.C. deputy, said he spent last year intentionally exploring “with fellow Christians at St. Patrick’s, Washington D.C., habits that perpetrate racism. We discerned together that the civil rights movement isn’t over. We’ve done a lot of the easy work; now we have to do the difficult work. We have to change our hearts and souls. It’s the work of the church. We have to do it together, as a community that’s going to learn from each other.”The Rev. Ramelle McCall, rector of St. Michael and All Angels, Baltimore, testified before a committee hearing that, as an African-American priest in the Diocese of Maryland, he and others have been working to build bridges with local authorities. But, he said, “racial profiling is real. It’s next door, and it frightens the hell out of me.”The Rev. Kim Turner Baker, who is African-American, petitioned for “a systematic way of studying and approaching these problems. What we need to do is help everybody look at this through a Gospel perspective and work to change the government.”She said she has served in various settings, sometimes as the only person of color in a congregation. While most people are of good will, she said statistics indicate “the majority of whites in this country very rarely have any interaction with a person of color. Our church is predominantly white; our church needs to be educated.”David Aniss, a Fond du Lac deputy, told the committee that an Education for Ministry course through Sewanee’s School of Theology about multicultural understanding became a focus for continued dialogue. “The fundamental problem is the lack of understanding between cultures,” he said. “There is a lot of almost-unconscious bias people show.”Kevin Smallwood reads a reflection about being racially profiled by hotel security. Photo: Lynn A. CollinsSarah Watkins, a member of the Episcopal Peace Fellowship Young Adults, told the committee that many people have to be taught how to talk about race and how to listen about it as well.“Where white people get hung up, with regards to anti-racism when there’s violence against people of color, we wring our hands and feel guilty and we don’t know how to move forward,” said Watkins, who is white.Anita George, 76, a deputy from Mississippi and a lifelong Episcopalian, said she has been engaged in the civil rights movement “since I was 17 years old. As a professional, I have done diversity work. As an educator I was doing multicultural work in educational as well as in church settings.”For so long, she said, people of color have struggled to tell their stories to majority groups and not always with the best results. But this convention – along with what’s going on in society – have a different feel because “the stories are being held right up in front of us, all around us,” she said. “It’s almost like Christ is saying, ‘Can’t you see? Look here. I’m showing you.’“I feel we’re in a time where we can’t deny the sin and the violence, and if we don’t step forward now as a church, I don’t know who else will.”‘Creating safe spaces to listen’Heidi Kim, Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society missioner for racial reconciliation, and Wynder said they aimed to create and to support “safe spaces” to allow opportunities for such conversations and connections to take place in Salt Lake City and beyond convention.Some of these opportunities during convention included:An evening with documentary filmmaker Arleigh Prelow, chronicling the life of noted theologian Howard Thurman, said to have influenced the Civil Rights Movement. Thurman established the nation’s first interracial, intercultural and interfaith congregation and advocated tirelessly for community among disparate races and faiths.Two screenings of the Emmy-nominated “Traces of the Trade,” examining the legacy of the slave trade in America. Episcopalian filmmaker Katrina Brown is a descendant of the DeWolf family, the largest slave-trading dynasty in U.S. history. The noted PBS documentary follows Brown and nine DeWolf descendants as they confront this legacy by retracing the Triangle Trade, and visiting the DeWolf hometown of Bristol, Rhode Island; slave forts in Ghana; and ruins of a family plantation in Cuba.Facilitating the screenings of Traces of the Trade were Dain Perry, a descendant of slave-traders, and his wife Constance, a descendant of slaves, who have screened the film throughout The Episcopal Church in dioceses and parishes, in the hopes of furthering conversations about race.The evening with Arleigh Prelow was presented by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society.“Both events seem especially important in light of events in Charleston, South Carolina,” noted Bishop Stacy Sauls, chief operating officer of The Episcopal Church. “These events will lead to worthwhile conversations and may be an effective way to further the work of racial justice and reconciliation in dioceses in the weeks and months following General Convention.”Said Kim: “Episcopalians throughout the church have lamented the violent deaths of African-Americans in South Carolina, Ferguson, Staten Island, Baltimore, and beyond, and want to answer our baptismal call to ‘strive for justice and peace among all people, and respect the dignity of every human being.’ These two films and the discussions around them will provide opportunities for participants to connect with others committed to the ministry of racial justice and reconciliation, and begin to discern together how to move this work forward in our congregations, dioceses and provinces.”Moving beyond black and white: Hearing all voicesRoja Singh, a St. John Fischer College sociology professor married to Rochester Bishop Prince Singh, said an overflow crowd of enthusiastic young people electrified one of the dialogues on race led by Kim and Wynder.“They had so much energy. So many people kept arriving that they ran out of chairs and were sitting on the floor,” she said.Included were: Sergio Trinidad-Estrada, 18; Ashley Seeley, 17; Jacqui Maes, 18; and Kinnon McPeak, 15; all from the Diocese of Olympia.They ranked racism, if not as No. 1, then certainly as the second-most serious challenge facing society and the church.Trinidad-Estrada and Seeley, who is Native American, said they had both experienced racially motivated bullying and harassment but, in the words of Maes, they all want “to be part of the generation that makes the change and is the change, and to get a better understanding of where other people are coming from.”They attended the dialogue on race to hear other perspectives and to help form some of their own. Most especially, they were impressed that “people were able to open up and to let us know the personal experiences they’ve had,”  Trinidad-Estrada said. “The opportunity to talk about your own experiences and see what you have in common and grow as a community together is phenomenal.”“Talking about it does help a lot,” said Seeley. “You know you’re not alone and there are other people who want to make it better.”McPeak said one of the issues was the lack of connection between races, something Singh also believes. “There needs to be trust-building across racial groups. We’re here in this together, we need to build a sense of solidarity.”Singh, a sociologist, said learning to embrace her identity as a Dalit, or untouchable person, in India made her feel vulnerable, but “the feeling of being outcast was more pronounced here” in the United States.“I’m very proud of The Episcopal Church, and this has been a wonderful convention with the anti-gun-violence march, the passage of marriage equality, the election of Bishop Michael Curry as the presiding bishop,” she said. “But how ready is the church structurally to address these issues?”The difficult challenge; vulnerability, being ‘broken open’At an Acts8Moment gathering, the Rev. Megan Castellan, a West Missouri alternate deputy, invited participants on a “quest to be broken open and to overcome our numbness and to see the spirit working in those around us.”Deeply listening to the stories of others — without judging or commenting — even when those stories evoke discomfort, or pain or joy or celebration, is a first step, she said.“It’s only when we hear one another’s stories, when we bear them in ourselves, that we can truly become the beloved community that God calls us to be, the community united in love, and overcome the divisions that separate us.”Byron Sloan, 28, a University of Arizona Episcopal campus minister, is Navajo and said that reconciliation, for him, was becoming baptized in The Episcopal Church.“Reconciliation means different things to different generations,” he said. “For me, it’s living into the intersectionality of my identity as Navajo and as Christian and being able to have the church honor all the parts of who (I am). For the older generation, it’s acknowledging wrongs that have been done.“I’m coming into the church at a time when I’m blessed to see the Doctrine of Discovery is being repudiated. It has let me see the church’s true colors,” added Sloan, an organizer of the Young Adult Festival at General Convention.Another speaker, Kevin Smallwood, 22, an Episcopal Service Corps intern at Christ Church Cathedral, in Springfield, Massachusetts, said he was racially profiled twice at his Salt Lake City hotel. These acts of overt racism brought him to tears, “tears I felt had been inside me forever.”“It pushed me to an emotional state where I felt the cries of all people of color who have overtly and covertly experienced racism.”He added: “I urge the church to radically answer the cries of people of color and to engage with the voices of every city we go to. Action is the language of the millennials. Let us act in Christ’s name.”Ryan Kenji Kuramitsu, 21, a Chicago native, said he joined The Episcopal Church three months ago after a trip to Manzanar, where Japanese-Americans were imprisoned during World War II, a trip which “first linked my racial identity and my faith in an organic way.“That was one of the moments I first convinced myself, ‘Wow, I should start thinking about race and my faith.’ It really does matter. I can’t just be color-blind in Christ.”A question he has for the church: “If we truly do believe that God is literally incarnated among people who are incarcerated, starved, tortured, lynched, crucified, shot, detained, pushed away, what does it say about us, that our church is not only the highest educated, but the wealthiest denomination in the United States?”He noted that no Asian-American has ever been invited to preach at a convention Eucharist. But he said the Taiko drums pounding were like the heartbeat of the Asian-American community, “passionate. It showed that we aren’t some complacent, silent model minorities, but threatening, powerful, drumming, shouting rhythms, that we do and say powerful things to threaten white supremacy in our church.”The Rev. Canon Frank Logue, a Georgia deputy and treasurer for the Acts8Moment, said the goal of the evening was that “we listen to each other, that is all we hope for. Basically all we want to do is proclaim resurrection in The Episcopal Church.”Said the Union of Black Episcopalians’ Buchanan: “These conversations will help to bridge the divide deep and wide within our church and sensitize us to the insidiousness of racism and injustice in our church.”She, too, said she felt a sense of hope in expanded leadership roles for women and people of color, with Curry’s election.But she added: “While we have these hopeful moments,” there are still moments in this convention that say there’s a lot more work to do.“Some of our young people have been racially profiled in our exhibit halls,” she said. “We’ve had some of our senior deputies challenged and asked whether they were guests at hotels. We’ve looked at our worship services and wondered why we couldn’t creatively blend all of our cultures and services to represent us all.”She smiled. “But, this is the path we’re on and it’s the path we’re committed to, and with God’s help, we’ll get there.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a member of the Episcopal News Service team reporting about the 78th General Convention. By Pat McCaughanPosted Jul 7, 2015 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Louis Stanley Schoen says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Racial Justice & Reconciliation Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Larry Hartman says: Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

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Reorganized Diocese of Fort Worth is ‘participating in resurrection’

first_imgReorganized Diocese of Fort Worth is ‘participating in resurrection’ Episcopalians are learning how to ‘be church,’ not just ‘go to church’ January 4, 2017 at 9:20 am In my opinion if I worked at 815, Would find a way to reconcile with the other diocese. How? I would allow them to continue to participate in the Pension and Health Insurance Programs, create common Christian education curriculum, drop all law suits, and wait. Reconciliation will come in a natural way. When it is time to come back, the church would be stronger.Bishop Rowe is right. The Episcopal Church has too much bureaucracy for its membership. We need 25 percent fewer diocese by 2020. You can have as many Bishops as you need. Let some of them also serve churches or other missions. Stop funding places that are not sustainable. The reminder of FT Worth is not sustainable. The church is holding on to get buildings in a law suit, sell them, and capitalize the profits to sustain the structure. Wrong approach! Our goal should be to grow the “Jesus Movement,” not the church. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Editor’s note: This is the first in a continuing series about the reinvention of the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth. This story was updated Jan. 9 with an explanation of how the Diocese of Fort Worth has calculated its growth statistics. [Episcopal News Service – Fort Worth, Texas] For Episcopalians who think of “church” as a place to go rather than a thing to be, the continuing Diocese of Fort Worth has some stories to share.They are stories of more than reorganizing – or even resuscitating – a diocesan and congregational structure after a majority of former clergy and lay leaders voted in November 2008 to leave the Episcopal Church. They are stories of resurrection – of Episcopalians reinventing church and, in the process, themselves.“We‘re not trying to rebuild an old church,” says Fort Worth Bishop Provisional J. Scott Mayer, who is also the bishop of the Diocese of Northwest Texas. “We are trying to participate in resurrection to become a new body.”Those people have built new ministries and, in the process, are developing new ways of being the church as they serve their communities.And, when they “go to church,” some Fort Worth Episcopalians are worshipping in unconventional spaces such as a theater and a strip mall. In one instance, the Wise County Episcopalians are worshipping in a building that began its life as the Episcopal Mission of the Ascension in 1889 and during the intervening years has been a mattress factory and, most recently, a wedding chapel.Even the bishop’s office is different. While the model of a bishop provisional is being used elsewhere in the Episcopal Church, it is still a relative rarity but one which Mayer thinks illustrates how dioceses could pool their resources.He notes that Diocese of Northwestern Pennsylvania Bishop Sean Rowe, who is also the bishop provisional of the Diocese of Bethlehem in the eastern part of that state, points out that in the 1960s the Episcopal Church had fewer dioceses but now has more dioceses and fewer people.“That may not be a sustainable model for all of us,” Mayer said, adding that while he is not necessarily advocating combining dioceses, the Church may need to find new ways to share diocesan resources.“And, in this case, the resource to share would be the bishop,” he said.Mayer is Fort Worth’s fourth bishop provisional. The first was then-Bishop of Kentucky Edwin F. “Ted” Gulick Jr. He was followed by retired Northwest Texas Bishop C. Wallis Ohl Jr. and then retired Texas Bishop Suffragan Rayford B. High Jr.Fort Worth has 17 congregations, including a Lutheran congregation pastored by an Episcopal priest. In the time since the split, the diocese has seen a 19.3 percent increase in communicant members and an 11.9 percent increase in operating revenue. Since reorganizing in 2009, Fort Worth has annually paid the full amount asked of it by the Episcopal Church to support the churchwide triennial budget.  It is the only one of six dioceses in the state of Texas to do so.Fort Worth Communication Director Katie Sherrod told Episcopal News Service that after the reorganization of the diocese in 2009, all its records were in disarray since the former bishop was occupying the diocesan offices and other Episcopal Church property. “We spent 2009 and 2010 locating Episcopalians, reconstructing congregations, finding clergy, and locating places to worship. By 2011/2012, we finally had a realistic assessment of membership in the congregations of the diocese,” she said. “It is those figures on which our assessment of our growth is based.”Transforming the way the Episcopal Church ministers in the 24 counties of north central Texas comes out of necessity, in part, as the Episcopal Church and the diocese seek to recover property and other assets still controlled those who left. The Texas Court of Appeals is considering the case after hearing oral arguments in the case on April 19, 2016.“It is anticipated, however, that the decision of this court will be appealed to the Texas Supreme Court by whichever party the ruling goes against at the Court of Appeals level,” Sherrod said.The wider Episcopal Church has supported the diocese’s reinvention. The Executive Council, which has met in the diocese twice since the split, in June offered a combination of a direct grant from the churchwide budget, money raised by the Church’s development office and the presiding bishop, and grants for church planting and mission enterprise zone development through the Resolution 2015-D005 church planting process.The funding, being matched by the diocese and its congregations, is helping to support clergy who are in charge of fast-growing faith communities.The 4 Saints Food Pantry, an effort to respond to the needs of and to build relationships with hungry people in a food desert on the east side of Fort Worth, has received a $20,000 Mission Enterprise Zone grant. The ministry will use the money to begin buying equipment required for a licensed food pantry. The pantry will operate out of St. Luke’s in the Meadow Episcopal Church, Fort Worth. Eventually, it will formally partner with the Tarrant Area Food Bank. St. Luke’s; St. Martin’s, Keller-Southlake; St. Stephen’s, Hurst; and St. Alban’s (worshiping in Theatre Arlington), are the four “saints” partnering in the ministry.Other grant requests, including one to plant a church on the fast-growing west side of Fort Worth, are in process, in an effort to claim additional funds related to D005, Sherrod said.In the coming days, Episcopal News Service will feature four of the Diocese of Fort Worth’s resurrection stories.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. January 3, 2017 at 9:46 pm I attend St.Stephen’s Episcopal Church, in Guymon OK, and we are blessed to be served by an ELCA pastor, whose parish is 20 miles to the south, at Oslo TX, and he is learning the Episcopal ‘ways’ and enjoying it. He has even attended our diocesan convention in OK. Apart from celebrating the Eucharist twice a month he has made visitations and assisted at the funeral of a long-time member. Fort Worth update John Miller says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Noreen Lundeen says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska the rev. Ann van dervoort says: Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Jeffrey Cox says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Michael Stone says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA January 4, 2017 at 9:21 am …I meant….grow the “Jesus Movement,” not the church structure. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed. Director of Music Morristown, NJ By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 3, 2017 Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books January 4, 2017 at 12:14 am Congratulatlons to The Diocese Fort Worth in THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH. We are a great CHURCH body and denomination. Too bad that the departing dioceses couldn’t see that. Our diocese has a few slogans. You can check them out on our.website: http://www.dohio.org. May God continually bless The Episcopal Church along with our wonderful Presiding Bishop, The Most Rverend Michael B. Curry, Jr,!!! I love OUR CHURCH!!! Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Martha Belury says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Jeffrey Cox says: Melinda Ray says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Jon Spangler says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (11) Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI January 3, 2017 at 7:46 pm While I am not happy that we, as a church, could not reconcile our differences, I am eager to see the split as a means to rethink what kind of church we want to be. This story is heart-warming. I am in a diocese that went through the same issues. It will cause us to pray for God’s guidance in the renewal of our diocese. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing January 3, 2017 at 9:08 pm In some ways a “unity” in a liberal sense is possible, however being a former Lutheran and a seminary graduate and now being an Episcopalian I would stress CARE in any sharing of“Clergy” as Lutherans DO NOT ACCEPT HOLY ORDERS and if there are any exchange ofdeacons it should be made clear that LUTHERANS DO NOT CONSIDER DEACONS TO BECLERGY. There are most likely other differences that need to be addressed. Unity, orworking together is good, care and respect for important differences in rites and traditionmust be carefully acknowledged. January 3, 2017 at 5:20 pm I am so happy for the diocese of Ft. Worth, the faithful Episcopalians and their clergy, especially the women! I was there during the dark days when the Episcopal Women’s Caucus had to celebrate the Eucharistic in a local synagogue. We were ever so grateful to our Jewish friends. It was a painful time, and I am thrilled about the “resurrection.” Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA April 9, 2017 at 1:54 pm A response, just my personal opinion, to Jeffrey Cox. First and foremost, those who LEFT the Episcopal CHOSE to leave us, not the other way around. And it is like being married. You cannot force someone to remain a part of a marriage if in their heart and mind they CHOOSE to leave. As for sustainable. Our congregation and every other congregation in this diocese have worked long and hard over the past years to return to being self-supporting. AND we pay our assessment both locally AND to the National Church. Many of us have been blessed with increases in membership and are doing well, thanks be to God. Our church has taken VERY little in the way of help, and has become much more fiscally responsible. Indeed in many ways – including spiritually – we are healthier than we have ever been. Who are you to judge us unsustainable? We are a part of the kingdom of God, and the Jesus movement, and we have been blessed beyond measure in too many ways to even begin to list. We may not have big fancy buildings but we have the Love of Jesus Christ, and are determined to continue to be His light and hands and feet in the world. Don’t you dare tell us we aren’t sustainable. With Christ for us, who can stand against us. AMEN.; January 3, 2017 at 4:33 pm I appreciate that there are some numbers in this article, as well as godly storytelling. Allow me to encourage more use of numbers, good and bad, in your series – though the good ones are sure nice to see. Congratulations, people of Fort Worth. You rock!I certainly was struck by Dio Fort Worth’s paying its full DFMS assessment – and the fact that none of its wealthier neighbors do. This missionary society of ours does less mission as a result. (This of course goes for everyone else in arrears too; maybe mine, I’ll check.) Till then I look forward to more godly storytelling from Ms. Schjonberg. We can always use more resurrection!++P.S. Is godly storytelling a thing, or did I just make that up? I kind of like the sound of it; if it’s a thing and I’m late to the party, kudos to the better informed. It’s certainly what I hope to hear, see, watch and read from clergy and lay – and the kind of stories I know we try to tell each other, which is why I love this church. Can’t wait for the next episode. Rector Albany, NY January 3, 2017 at 6:40 pm My father, Father Bill Belury, (former Rector of St John’s Fort Worth, 1980-1994) was very sad to see the split of the church in his home diocese over such a trivial issue. Dad truly walked the walk of feeding the poor, sheltering the downtrodden and loving ALL of our neighbors. I believe that the work of the newly formed Diocese would have brought joy to Dad. And, it is inspiring to me to see people participating in the resurrection. Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Josh Thomas says: Tags January 3, 2017 at 4:36 pm “We are trying to participate in resurrection to become a new body.” (Bishop Provisional J. Scott Mayer)EVERY church and diocese should be renewing itself continuously in order to “make all things new.” Otherwise we have missed the mark and are not fulfilling the charge Jesus and His Father gave us by the grace of the Holy Spirit. I hope the Diocese of Fort Worth is as successful in court as it has been in “walking the walk” since 2008.As a member of St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church (http://www.saintgregorys.org) in San Francisco since 1998, I have seen that this self-renewal and reinvention is not only possible but critically necessary for the success and nurturance of our life together. Keep the faith! Maxanna Demko says: Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CAlast_img read more

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Du cœur financier de Londres à la cathédrale de Montréal

first_img Le doyen et recteur Bertrand Olivier. (Présence/François Gloutnay)Depuis le 8 février, la cathédrale Christ Church de Montréal a un nouveau recteur et le diocèse anglican de Montréal a un nouveau doyen. Le prêtre, dont la candidature a été acceptée au terme d’un long processus de sélection, est arrivé à Montréal deux jours plus tôt. Il n’aura pris que quelques heures pour faire ses bagages car le dimanche 4 février, il célébrait la messe pour la dernière fois à All Hallows by the Tower, la plus vieille église de Londres, une paroisse qu’il animait depuis treize ans.Celui qui remplacera John Paul Kennington, doyen et recteur depuis 2011 qui a décidé en 2016 de retourner en Angleterre pour des raisons familiales, est donc un Londonien.Un Londonien d’adoption plutôt. Car Bertrand Olivier, 55 ans, le nouveau doyen du diocèse anglican de Montréal, est né en France, à Dunkerque, a grandi dans une famille catholique et a étudié dans un collège tenu par les maristes.Anglophile dès son jeune âge, il passait ses étés en Angleterre. En 1986, le jeune professionnel s’est installé à Londres où il travaillait en relations publiques avant de créer sa propre boîte de communications. Dix ans plus tard, Bertrand Olivier était ordonné diacre de l’Église d’Angleterre, puis prêtre en 1997.Organiste dans une paroisse anglicane«À 18 ans, la religion, ce n’était pas mon intérêt le plus grand», concède le nouveau recteur, assis dans un banc de la cathédrale Christ Church de Montréal. «Et mon but n’était pas de devenir anglican. Mais ce qui m’a toujours retenu dans l’Église, c’est que je voulais jouer de l’orgue.» À Londres, il devint organiste dans une paroisse anglicane.«C’est ainsi que j’ai mis le doigt dans l’anglicanisme. Dieu a le sens de l’humour», dit-il.«J’ai trouvé dans la communauté où j’étais organiste quelque chose qui me rappelait d’où je venais. Cela a été une continuation dans mon cheminement. Mais je ne me doutais pas que j’allais recevoir un appel vocationnel. C’est arrivé dans une cathédrale au nord de Londres. J’ai reçu cet appel qui a bouleversé ma vie», dit-il, levant les yeux vers le ciel.Il entreprit des études en théologie tout en continuant son emploi, qu’il quittera sans regret. Son diocèse lui confia une première paroisse située dans un quartier défavorisé de Londres. Trois ans plus tard, il s’occupait d’une paroisse qui compte beaucoup de professionnels et de jeunes familles.Puis ce fut All Hallows by the Tower, l’église aux cotés de la tour de Londres, là où ont été décapités en 1535 Thomas More et John Fischer, tous deux canonisés 400 ans plus tard par le pape Pie XI. C’est une paroisse sans résidents, mais grouillante de monde durant la semaine. On y anime une pastorale pour les gens qui viennent travailler dans la City, le cœur financier de Londres.Un nouveau défi«Tout allait très bien à All Hallows by the Tower. J’aurais pu y demeurer jusqu’à la retraite. Mais cela ne me satisfaisait plus.»C’est dans sa personnalité, reconnaît-il. «Je n’aime pas quand la vie devient trop confortable. Dieu m’appelle à faire des choses qui me mettent au défi, qui me permettent de grandir et de faire fructifier mes talents que je mets au service de tous. Je n’aime pas trop ronronner.»Et surtout, dit-il, «je voulais réexplorer ma foi… en français».Il connaissait déjà le précédent recteur et doyen John Paul Kennington. «On a été ordonnés dans le même diocèse. Je savais qu’il était ici et que c’était un job dont il parlait avec beaucoup d’affection.» Mais Montréal n’est pas sur son radar.Jusqu’au moment où «la petite annonce est apparue sur mon écran». Deux fois plutôt qu’une, durant la même semaine. «Il faut que j’explore cette possibilité», s’est alors dit le vicaire de All Hallows by the Tower, dont la photographie est toujours affichée à la une du site paroissial.«J’avais envie d’une expérience nord-américaine et d’une Église qui n’est pas majoritaire, qui n’est pas une Église d’État, si on peut dire. Je voulais vivre un ministère d’une manière différente. Je voulais parler français mais je ne voulais pas rentrer en France et perdre mon anglais.»Au terme de deux longues conservations en ligne puis d’un weekend d’entrevue à Montréal avec le comité de sélection, la candidature du révérend Bertrand Olivier fut acceptée. «Venir à Montréal, c’est un projet qui me permet de faire une intégration d’éléments différents de ma vie et de redécouvrir ma personnalité francophone», se réjouit-il.L’histoireIl quitte toutefois une église historique – All Hallows by the Tower a été fondée en l’an 675! – pour une cathédrale, certes, mais âgée de seulement 160 ans.«Beaucoup de gens sont éblouis par les églises historiques. L’histoire, c’est important, cela attire des visiteurs», reconnaît-il. «Mais ces visiteurs, ce ne sont pas forcément des gens qui viennent redécouvrir leur foi ou qui veulent la vivre. La vraie histoire, c’est celle de Jésus, une histoire qui dure depuis plus longtemps que les églises.»«Les bâtiments sont là pour nous aider à nous rassembler, à prier», ajoute le 23e recteur de la cathédrale anglicane de Montréal. «Ce sont des tremplins. Ce qui m’intéresse, c’est de pouvoir parler de Dieu et de Jésus avec tous ceux que je rencontre. Et j’espère, de temps en temps, pouvoir transformer une vie. C’est cela qui m’importe aujourd’hui.»ŒcuménismeSon arrivée étant toute récente, le révérend Bertrand Olivier n’a pas encore rencontré des représentants d’autres Églises chrétiennes de Montréal. Mais il souhaite tisser des liens œcuméniques car il estime que «les Églises sont toujours plus fidèles à la parole du Christ lorsqu’elles travaillent ensemble».«Dans un monde très sécularisé, il faut rechercher ce qui nous unit, pas ce qui nous sépare», affirme le nouveau recteur.Le nouveau doyen indique qu’il est «marié avec a same sex partner» – une des rares expressions anglaises qu’il ait utilisé durant cette entrevue qui a duré trente minutes. «Paul – c’est le prénom de son conjoint – viendra me rejoindre mais il est toujours à Londres». Il compte bien participer au débat sur le mariage entre conjoints de même sexe dans l’Église anglicane du Canada. Le diocèse de Montréal, où il œuvrera dorénavant, permet le mariage homosexuel depuis l’an dernier, même si l’Église nationale ne doit officiellement se prononcer qu’en 2019 sur cette question qui divise les diocèses canadiens.La cérémonie d’installation du nouveau recteur et doyen aura lieu le dimanche 11 mars à la cathédrale Christ Church de Montréal. Elle débutera à 16 h. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Anglican Communion Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Tags Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Du cœur financier de Londres à la cathédrale de Montréal An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY de François GloutnayPosted Mar 5, 2018 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more

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Episcopalians, world religious leaders confront climate disruption

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Margaret Bullitt-JonasPosted Jun 20, 2018 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem His All-Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, head of the Orthodox Church, releases a rehabilitated kestrel during an international symposium on the climate crisis. Photo: Robert A. Jonas[Episcopal News Service] Earlier this month, leaders of the Eastern church and the Western church, representing billions of people worldwide, spoke with one voice about the moral urgency of confronting the climate crisis.“A civilization is defined and judged by our respect for the dignity of humanity and the integrity of nature,” declared the head of the Orthodox Church, His All-Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, in his keynote address for an international symposium held June 5-8 in Greece. “Toward a Green Attica: Preserving the Planet and Protecting Its People” was the ninth international interdisciplinary and interreligious symposium that the patriarch has convened since 1991 to highlight the spiritual basis of ecological care and to strengthen collaboration across disciplines in the quest to build a just and habitable world.Two hundred leaders in a variety of fields – science, economics, theology, public policy, journalism, business, human rights and social justice activism – attended the symposium, which gathered initially in Athens and then moved to the islands of Spetses and Hydra. Participants studied the latest findings of climate science, explored strategic actions toward sustainability and resilience, and renewed their commitment to push for the economic and societal changes that must take place if we are to avert social and ecological chaos and widespread suffering. (For the program and a list of participants, visit here.)The Rt. Rev. Nicholas Holtam, bishop of Salisbury, represented the archbishop of Canterbury and affirmed the commitment of the Anglican Consultative Council to address the climate crisis (e.g., Resolution 16.08: Response to Global Climate Change). As the Church of England states on its website, “We believe that responding to climate change is an essential part of our responsibility to safeguard God’s creation.” From Sept. 1 to Oct. 4, Anglicans will unite with Christians around the world to care for God’s creation in during the annual “Season of Creation.” (Materials for participating in the “Season of Creation” through worship, study and prayer are available from the Anglican Communion Environmental Network and other sources here; a guide to celebrating the 2018 “Season of Creation” is available here.)Cardinal Peter Turkson, a Ghanaian cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church who worked closely with Pope Francis in developing the papal encyclical “Laudato Si’,” represented the pope at the symposium. Turkson read a statement from Pope Francis that included these lines: “It is not just the homes of vulnerable people around the world that are crumbling, as can be seen in the world’s growing exodus of climate migrants and environmental refugees. As I sought to point out in my Encyclical ‘Laudato Si’,’ we may well be condemning future generations to a common home left in ruins. Today we must honestly ask ourselves a basic question: ‘What kind of world do we want to leave to those who come after us, to children who are now growing up?’” (The entire statement can be found here.)One of the most powerful, disturbing and illuminating lectures was given by Jeffrey Sachs, a world-renowned professor of economics and director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University. Sachs gave a one-hour overview of the history of economics that included a blistering critique of corporate capitalism and its veneration of greed, by which “nature is utterly sacrificed for profit,” he said. (A professional videographer recorded the speech, but until that video becomes available, you can watch a recording here.)Professor Hans Joachim Schellnhuber, director of Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, gave a hair-raising presentation on the precarious health of “the vital organs of the planet,” such as the Gulf Stream, coral reefs, alpine glaciers, the Amazon rainforest and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (a recent study shows that Antarctica’s ice loss has tripled in a decade; if that continues, we are in serious trouble). Citing “A roadmap for rapid decarbonization,” a 2017 article from the journal “Science,” Schellnhuber contended that we could halve carbon emissions every decade – “but we have to want to do it.”Other speakers likewise underscored the urgent need to galvanize our vision, will, and moral courage as we confront the climate crisis, which poses an existential threat to civilization.Both Turkson and Sachs left the symposium early to make a trip to Rome. Pope Francis had taken the unprecedented step of inviting the world’s top fossil fuel executives – including the chairman of Exxon Mobil, the chief executive of the Italian energy giant Eni, and the chief executive of BP – along with money managers of major financial institutions, to meet with him in a two-day closed-door conference at the Vatican. Turkson and Sachs joined the meeting to add their perspectives.“There is no time to lose,” the pope told the participants. He appealed to them “to be the core of a group of leaders who envision the global energy transition in a way that will take into account all the peoples of the earth, as well as future generations and all species and ecosystems.”Thus, in one extraordinary week, Christian churches, both East and West, called for robust action to address climate disruption.The Rt. Rev. Marc Andrus, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of California and leader of the presiding bishop’s delegation to U.N. Climate Summits, commented, “The moment is dire, and also is (humanity’s) moment of greatest possibility. St. Irenaeus called a human fully alive the glory of God. Now, 1,300 years later, we may understand that for humanity to act as one for the good of the Earth is yet a greater expression of God’s glory.”Looking back on the symposium, Andrus was thankful for its “great spirit of respect and mutuality. Rather than lobbying to enlist people to each cause, there was a celebration of what each person is doing to heal the Earth, and a seeking to support each person on their path, to make connections. A good example of this to me was the tremendous joy we all felt as the ecumenical patriarch released two kestrels that had been nursed back to health by an Athenian woman whose ministry is protecting and healing endangered birds.”Another Episcopal participant, Sheila Moore Andrus, a biologist and an active climate champion from the Diocese of California, expressed appreciation for the opportunity to meet new climate activists and connect with individuals she has long respected – including the Rev. Fletcher Harper, who, she said, “is currently working on a project similar to one I am working on for the Diocese of California: a web-based tool that can help people decrease their carbon footprint and aggregate those choices by church and diocesan community. The conference gave Fletcher, Marc and me a chance to explore ways to promote such a tool among interfaith groups, and all this in settings filled with inspiring talks and sacred indoor/outdoor spaces.”Harper, executive director of GreenFaith, concluded: “The fact that it was searingly hot during the symposium made the point about the need for action as powerfully as any of the speakers. This September, the multifaith service at Grace Cathedral (in San Francisco) at the start of the Global Climate Action Summit gives everyone a chance – whether in person or on the livestream – to commit to living the change in our own diet, transportation and home energy use that’s needed for a non-scorched, sustainable future.”— The Rev. Dr. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas serves as missioner for creation care, Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts and Massachusetts Conference, United Church of Christ. She maintains a website: RevivingCreation.org. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice, Environment & Climate Change Rector Bath, NC Episcopalians, world religious leaders confront climate disruption Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Ecumenical & Interreligious, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

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Council is ‘leading from the future as it emerges,’ mutual…

first_imgCouncil is ‘leading from the future as it emerges,’ mutual ministry review shows Diocese of North Carolina Bishop Suffragan Anne Hodges-Copple, an Executive Council member, breaks the bread during the Eucharist. The Rev. Lillian Davis-Wilson, a deacon and council member from Western New York, served with Hodges-Copple. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] The Executive Council is starting to lead The Episcopal Church toward the future using what is currently happening in the church and in the world, according to a recently completed mutual ministry review.General Convention in 2015 called (via Resolution A004) for a cross section of council members to do such reviews on a regular basis. The reviews are not meant to be performance evaluations. Instead, they are designed for groups to reflect on their ministry together. A group of 12 council members, including the officers and the six people who formed a transitional executive committee of council between the 2015-2018 triennium and the current 2019-2021 triennium participated in the reviews in late 2016 and 2018.The reviews are aimed at “looking at the present from the standpoint of the future,” said Matthew Sheep, who teaches management, organizational behavior and leadership at Illinois State University. Sheep, who facilitated both reviews, told the council during the opening session of its June 10-13 meeting here that the participants in the most recent review, which began in November 2018, are open to considering a number of “possible futures.”The 2018 review found that the participants feel there is a “rebuilt trust” among council members, officers and the churchwide staff. All have a sense that people assume the best intentions on the part of others, rather than assuming that others are only looking out for their own interests. They also appreciate, according to Sheep, a clarity and strength of the organization’s mission and vision, impactful leadership and council’s decision in October to reduce and restructure its committees.Episcopal Church Executive Council member Julia Ayala Harris of the Diocese of Oklahoma preaches June 10 during a Eucharist that opened the council’s June 10-13 meeting at the Maritime Institute Conference Center in Linthicum Heights, Maryland, outside Baltimore. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe council has an “improved organizational climate,” Sheep said.The participants are also concerned about sustaining those improvements, regardless of any changes that might happen in leadership. For instance, the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, House of Deputies president, will complete her third and final term at the end of the 2021 meeting of General Convention and leave the council.Among the areas that need improvement, the review said, are the financial cost of governance, further clarification of roles and responsibilities, methods to bring the Way of Love to all levels of the church, and strategies for dealing with tensions as they arise. Sheep encouraged the council’s willingness to look at “possible futures,” envisioning what it might look like to improve these areas “and where it might lead.”Earlier in the meeting, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry told the council during his opening remarks that the relationship between the council and the churchwide staff is “growing and developing in healthy and positive ways.”At a June 3-5 gathering, the staff spent time considering how each person’s work advances the church’s priorities of evangelism, reconciliation and care of creation. Sometimes, that work is obvious, Curry said, but sometimes the relationship of work such as making sure the boiler is working and the checks are written on time to those priorities is not so clear.Evoking Ephesians 4:11-12, Curry said his job, as well as that of both the staff and the council, is to “equip the church to be the Jesus Movement in the world, witnessing and walking the Way of Love.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Jennings agreed with Curry’s idea of looking at staff and council effectiveness by how they equip the church for mission. And, she added a caution. In her opening remarks, she noted that many people want to say that the world is in a “post-institutional age.”Even in The Episcopal Church, she said, people “seek to flatten structures and decentralize power.”“Every three years, we go to General Convention to debate the budget, and we hear about how we should be funding mission, not governance and institutional structures, as though the mission happens by magic,” Jennings said.If the church wants to be the Jesus Movement, “we have to focus on how we are actually going to move,” she said. “We have to remember that governance is mission, just the same as programs that more commonly get defined that way. General Convention’s commitments to creation care and to racial reconciliation and to evangelism would mean very little without the governing structures of the church that help make them happen.” TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Also during the meeting’s first day, the council* heard a report from Treasurer Kurt Barnes that showed the 2019 part of the church’s 2019-2021 budget is on track. Barnes also noted that the Episcopal Church Center in New York is fully leased. The two newest tenants are a True Value Hardware store, which has taken over the former bookstore space on the street level, and a physical therapy practice.Barnes said the first of three mailings soliciting donations to the church’s Annual Appeal from 38,000 constituents has raised $90,000 towards the $250,000 goal. In addition, the church’s effort to raise money to provide future retirement benefits for current and retired clergy in the Episcopal Church of Cuba has raised $730,000 through the end of May. Additional unconfirmed pledges could take the total over the $800,000 goal, he said.* spent time with Ursuline Bankhead, a New York psychologist who led the members in implicit bias awareness training. Implicit bias, Bankhead explained, is an automatic preference for certain groups over others. It operates below the consciousness and is culture-bound, pervasive, evoked by group membership and taught by parents and other elders. Implicit bias is normal but also malleable, she added. “We can change it. This is the beauty of bias; it is not stuck,” Bankhead said.Curry had said during his opening remarks that racial reconciliation in the United States is “the gateway to all the ways we are broken and fragmented and separated from each other, so it’s the entrance not the end.” Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Executive Council June 2019, Rector Albany, NY Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ Executive Council, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC General Convention, Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Way of Love Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA * learned that the Rev. Jabriel Ballentine from the Diocese of Central Florida had resigned his seat on Executive Council. The council will elect a person to serve the remainder of his term, which runs through General Convention in 2021. The Rev. Michael Barlowe, the church’s executive officer, told the council that its executive committee will develop a list of nominees. He said he and others were considering the propriety of council to hold a special electronic meeting for the election so that the person could begin serving at the next meeting in October. Information on the solicitation for nominations will be released soon.The rest of the meetingCouncil will spend most of June 11 and 12 meeting in its four committees. On June 13, the chairs of those committees will each report to the full body, proposing resolutions for the council to consider.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1). The council comprises 38 members – 20 (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 laypeople) elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by the nine provincial synods for six-year terms – plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies. In addition, the vice president of the House of Deputies, secretary, chief operating officer, treasurer and chief financial officer have seat and voice but no vote.Some council members are tweeting from the meeting using #ExCoun.The June 10-13 meeting is taking place at the Maritime Institute Conference Center outside Baltimore.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 10, 2019 last_img read more