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Collection to benefit Haiti

first_imgA collection will be taken during the second quarter of the Western Michigan game Saturday to support efforts by Notre Dame and the Congregation of Holy Cross to rebuild Haiti following January’s destructive earthquake. The collection will be taken in honor of Blessed Brother André Bessette, who will become the first saint from the Congregation of Holy Cross to be canonized Oct. 17. Mike Seamon, associate vice president of Campus Security, said the collection would be “a huge weekend celebration for the congregation.” “This is the perfect way to celebrate the canonization of the first Holy Cross saint as well as make people aware of the rebuilding in Haiti,” Seamon said. All donations from the collection will go to the efforts of the Holy Cross Missions in Haiti as they try to rebuild and administer to the needs of the people both physically and spiritually. Over 300 students have volunteered their time to walk through the stands collecting donations. Many Holy Cross seminarians will also be participating in the stadium collection, which will take place during the first media timeout of the second quarter. The collection will be a quick event that will only take about eight to 10 minutes, he said. Seamon said Notre Dame has only held two other game day collections, one after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001 and another after Hurricane Katrina. Students who volunteer to take collections will have the opportunity to take a VIP tour of the Notre Dame Stadium press box and locker room. “It’s a small way to say ‘thank you’ for giving up their time at the game,” Seamon said. Seamon added that he was impressed by the number of students who volunteered to take collections. “It has been unbelievable how students rise to the occasion,” Seamon said. “Their generosity is truly inspiring.”last_img read more

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Sprint CEO talks cell service at ND

first_imgMobile carrier Sprint plans to increase the company’s 3G coverage on campus and to introduce a unique Notre Dame Sprint ID Pack, CEO and Notre Dame alumnus Dan Hesse said. The company hopes to reach out to students who are either searching for a mobile carrier or who are dissatisfied with their current company, Hesse said. “If there is not great coverage at Notre Dame, I hear it from everyone,” Hesse said. “It may be a selfish perspective, but Notre Dame deserves nothing less than the best.” The target market for Sprint is shifting from businessmen and women to college students, Hesse said. “It is very important for us as a company to reach out to students,” Hesse said. “By serving on the board at the Mendoza College of Business and lecturing a couple of times per year, it is clear [to me] who our target customers are.” Sprint’s current packages reflect the needs of a student demographic, he said. “Simplicity and value are the two qualities which we attempt to show in all of our products,” Hesse said. “Unlimited text, surf, mobile-to-mobile calls and various other data features starting at $70 per month is a package no other company can beat.” In addition to improving 3G coverage, Hesse said Sprint is also developing a Notre Dame ID Pack to be released in the spring. A Sprint ID Pack groups applications on a mobile device to organize them for a particular user’s needs. “Each mobile marketplace has well over 1,000 apps, so the question of, ‘How do I navigate through all of my apps?’ presents itself,” he said. “To answer this, Sprint has introduced ID Packs which can be catered to whatever one’s personal interests may be.” Sprint built ID Packs for companies such as ESPN and Disney in the past. “Notre Dame will be the first university we will be giving this capability to,” Hesse said. “The Notre Dame ID Pack will have everything one may find on the www.nd.edu website, including on-the-go access to an InsideND account, CourseWare files and content on Concourse.” Hesse said he hopes to develop ID Packs for Notre Dame athletic teams, alumni and fans as well as for students. The Notre Dame ID Pack will be available exclusively on Android phones or tablets. Hesse, a 1975 graduate, said he maintains a strong connection between the University and his company. The company outfitted Notre Dame’s athletic department with 200 Sprint devices for demo purposes. Hesse said his experience as a Notre Dame student built the foundation for his company policies. Sprint operates on a high level of social responsibility, Hesse said, because of the ethical principles he learned as a Notre Dame undergraduate. “Newsweek recently ranked Sprint No. six on their list of the 500 Greenest American Companies,” Hesse said. “The next closest mobile carrier was ranked at number 99.” Customer service is also important to the company, he said. “Sprint’s customer service has improved more than any company in any industry,” Hesse said. “We were recently ranked on the J.D. Power 2011 Customer Service Champions list.” Notre Dame students should use the lessons they learn during their four years in college to enter a career field they truly love, Hesse said. “You must choose something you are truly passionate about and something you will work hard for,” Hesse said. “This University teaches its students lifelong ethical values when, combined with hard work, will take you far.”last_img read more

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Club studies hacking

first_imgStudents who have fallen victim to a computer virus or identity theft before are all too aware of the importance of computer security. But a group of Notre Dame students is exploring the process of hacking to promote computer skills. In the academic world, computer scientists and engineers study computer hacking to gain a better understanding of how to protect against it. A new initiative by Notre Dame’s Linux Users Club, a group focused on educating students about the open-source Linux operating system, is intended to encourage members to explore computer hacking. Senior Jared Schneider, a computer science major in the club, is working on the initiative. He ultimately hopes for the club to compete in national hacking challenges, such as DEF CON, the preeminent hacking convention held in Las Vegas every summer. “The idea is to get everybody, no matter what [his or her] major or skill level, to the same point,” he said. “Then from there, we get the ball rolling. We’re years of dedication away from that.” Schneider found inspiration for the initiative from other schools’ hacking clubs, especially Carnegie Mellon University’s. “Carnegie has this team, [Plaid Parliament of Pwning], that consecutively ranks [in the] top-ten at the hacking challenges,” he said. “They got second at DEF CON with a team of 11 people. The first-place team had 80.” While Schneider doesn’t have any hopes of the club sending a team to DEF CON in the near future, he would like to see them compete at some level. “Usually there are qualifiers to the events,” he said. “They’re usually remote, so we could probably participate in one of those.” Schneider hopes the club will work toward a competitive skill level through the study of reverse engineering. “When you code something, you put it into a form that only the computer can understand for the most part,” he said. “Reverse engineering is like taking the cow out of a hamburger. You’re bringing out code that is unusable to anyone but the computer, and bringing that back into usable form.” He said many universities do not provide education in this area of computer science. “A lot of people don’t like to teach it because it’s also a way to steal things,” he said. “If Microsoft comes out with a great new program, reverse engineering is a way to go into its code and find out how it works, and that’s where intellectual property issues come up.” The reverse-engineering initiative is putting a unique twist on the club’s stated purpose, Schneider said. “The idea of the club is basically to introduce people to Linux,” he said. “It’s about creating an environment for professors and students to work together … There’s a lot of untapped potential there.” Whether or not the club ever makes it to DEFCON, Schneider said the skills gained by competitive hacking training would benefit the club’s members. “[Hacking] is about self-guided learning and learning a different way to look at things,” he said. “It’s not about placing in competitions.” Contact John Cameron at [email protected]last_img read more

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Scholar of religions to deliver SMC Christian Culture Lecture

first_imgReza Aslan, New York Times-bestselling author, internationally acclaimed scholar of religions and professor of creative writing at the University of California, Riverside, will speak at the 2014 Christian Culture Lecture in O’Laughlin Auditorium on Sept. 16, according to a press release from the Saint Mary’s department of humanistic studies.Aslan will base his lecture, “Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth,” on his best-selling book of the same title, the press release stated.Laura Ambrose, assistant professor of humanistic studies and coordinator of the Christian Culture Lecture, said Aslan is an ideal fit for the annual lecture because his work mirrors the College’s commitment to encourage an interfaith dialogue.“He identifies himself as being Muslim, his wife is Christian, his mother is Christian and he both personally and professionally seems committed to understanding different faith traditions in a global world,” Ambrose said. “I think that is something as a Catholic College, as a faith based institution, [that] we have a real responsibility to encourage, and he fits right into that.”Aslan holds a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), a master’s degree, a Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) and a Ph.D., all from different institutions, according to his website. Ambrose said this interdisciplinary background enables him to speak to students from a variety of different academic concentrations.“One of the things we pride ourselves on in humanistic studies is that we are interdisciplinary,” she said. “He received training in a number of different areas. His B.A. was in religious studies, his Ph.D. was sociology and the history of religion, his M.F.A. from University of Iowa and he also has a master’s in theological studies from Harvard. We liked that he could speak to the writing side of a lot our students, so what it would be like to choose that life, but also this academic side in different disciplines that we have here.”Clare Maher, a senior humanistic studies and history double major, said Aslan embodies the essence of the Christian Culture Lecture series.“The Christian Culture Lecture is trying to provoke academic conversation and academic debate in a context that encourages the Saint Mary’s community to think deeper about things and to look at their own positions,” Maher said. “… He looks at this perspective of Jesus from a very historical standpoint, and I always think that’s an interesting aspect coming from a Catholic education myself all the way up until now.”Ambrose said Aslan combines analytical and personal perspective on religion in a way that encourages honest intellectual conversation among students, academics and people with interests in religious studies.“He is a really engaging, interesting person who can get people to start to think about hard questions in ways that don’t seem so intimidating or in ways that shut down conversation,” Ambrose said. “A lot of times when people start to talk about religion you can retreat into this personal space and then there is no real conversation and I think he is really good at calming people down and getting people to actually talk.”“He doesn’t discredit the personal and I think that’s something I find really powerful about him,” she said. “… Learning how to have an intellectual discussion in a classroom can be hard because there are the two sides of who we are. There is our gut instinct which may come from experience or emotion, and there’s that analytic part. That analytic part does work with the other and I think he is good at combining that.”Tags: Christian Culture Lecture, religions, saint mary’s, SMClast_img read more

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Author to address racial injustice

first_imgMichelle Alexander, acclaimed civil rights lawyer, advocate, legal scholar and bestselling author will speak at Saint Mary’s on Feb. 9 at 7 p.m. in O’Laughlin Auditorium. Her lecture, titled “Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness,” will be based off her book “The New Jim Crow,” discussing racial injustice in the American legal system.Alexander has taught at universities such as Stanford Law School, where she was an associate professor of law and directed the Civil Rights Clinics, according to a press release. In 2005, she accepted a joint appointment at the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity and the Moritz College of Law at The Ohio State University, where she is now an associate professor. That same year she won a Soros Justice Fellowship, which supported the writing of “The New Jim Crow.”“We have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it,” Alexander said in a press release. She criticized the “war on drugs” and said when prisoners leave jail labeled as felons they become trapped in a cycle of discrimination preventing them from improving their lives by finding a job, housing or health benefits.In her book, she analyzes the criminal justice system from racial and ethical standpoints and proposes ideas to combat what she calls an epidemic.Elaine Meyer-Lee, director of the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL) at Saint Mary’s, said Alexander’s lecture comes at a critical time in America.“We look forward to hearing Michelle Alexander’s very timely perspectives on these critical issues of race in our justice system with which our nation is so actively wrestling,” Meyer-Lee said. “Bringing such speakers is part of our institution’s commitment, as outlined in Saint Mary’s strategic plan ‘Boldly Forward’ to be a ‘college where students learn to live, study and work with intercultural awareness and competence.’”Mana Derakhshani, associate director of CWIL, said awareness of the systemic racial issues is important because students have the power to change it.“Michelle Alexander’s research points out the racialization of the criminal system as well as at the unconscious biases that we all carry,” Derakhshani said. “It is important for students and everyone to understand we do not live in a post-racial era and that in spite of the advances made through the Civil Rights movement, there are still many ways that systems are keeping our society very stratified.”The lecture is free and open to the public, but due to anticipated high demand it will be ticketed. Tickets may be reserved by calling the Moreau Box Office.Tags: center for women’s intercultural leadership, CWIL, michelle alexander, the new jim crowlast_img read more

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Campus Ministry adopts Friends with Sisters program

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Amy Smesseart This year Friends with Sisters, which connects the Sisters of the Holy Cross with Saint Mary’s students, transitioned from a campus club to a Campus Ministry program.Regina Wilson, director of Campus Ministry, said the change in the program, which was founded in 1976, helps to keep Friends with Sisters more structured as students graduate. “By making it a program within Campus Ministry, there is a more integrated support system for students from year to year. It seemed like a natural fit for Friends with Sisters to become part of Campus Ministry,” Wilson said.Each member of Friends with sisters is paired with a Sister of the Holy Cross, Wilson said. Program members then have one-on-one time each week with their designated sister, where relationships can be strengthened in a personal setting. Volunteer coordinator and director of activities for Sisters of the Holy Cross, Lee Ann Moore, said the program is about “forming relationships between sisters and students that are rooted in friendship and nurtured over the years while the students are at the College.”“The students and sisters become friends and get to know one another better: the students learn about the sisters’ lives and ministry experience and the sisters learn about the students’ lives and college experience,” Moore said.Bridget Enright, senior and president of Friends with Sisters said, “This is my fourth year in the program, and my fourth year knowing Sr. Virginia Marie. Sister Virginia has been a source of inspiration, of joy, and of connection to my faith.” Enright said she is pleased with Campus Ministry’s involvement in the program.  “By re-establishing Friends with Sisters as a program under the Campus Ministry office, we have been able to make an even stronger connection between the Sisters of the Holy Cross and the Saint Mary’s campus,” Enright said.This year Friends with Sisters has 78 students and 74 sisters involved in the program. Recently, the program had a kickoff with an ice cream social.“At the [kickoff] party, students came to the convent to meet their Sister who will be their friend, mentor and companion for the rest of their college career,” Enright said.First-year student Monica Davy said she is thrilled to be part of Friends with Sisters.“I am so thankful to attend a college that provides the opportunity to develop a relationship with a Sister of the Holy Cross,” Davy said.Enright said the Friends with Sisters program is unique to the Saint Mary’s experience.“While the relationships between each student and sister is unique, I believe every girl starting in the program very quickly appreciates the genuine and loving friendship the sisters offer us,” Enright said.Upcoming events for Friends with Sisters this year include an annual Halloween Costume party on Oct. 26 and a Thanksgiving Reflection program on Nov. 23.Tags: Campus Ministry, New program, Sisters of the Holy Cross, SMClast_img read more

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Undocumented immigrant addresses diversity, immigration

first_imgJose Antonio Vargas spoke at Saint Mary’s on Wednesday about his experiences as an undocumented immigrant and the work he has done as a journalist and with his organization, Define American, to discuss immigration and diversity. His presentation was the final part of the Diverse Students Leadership Conference presented by the Student Diversity Club at Saint Mary’s. Vargas said he was brought to the United States when he was 12 years old to live with his grandparents, leaving behind his immediate family. He said that he didn’t know he was undocumented until he was 16, and at that time he saw it as a burden and as a form of isolation he had to overcome.“I internalized being on the outside — my existence was a problem to be solved,” Vargas said. “I tried to face everything that I am.”Vargas said he wanted to become a journalist because — although he didn’t have legal citizenship papers — his name could be printed in the newspaper, next to the stories he wrote. He said he has consistently gone against the advice he has been given about being so public regarding his undocumented status. “Twenty seven lawyers gave me a choice: ‘Do you want to self-deport? Or do you want to wait be deported?’ I went against the advice of 27 lawyers,” he said.Vargas said a huge issue surrounding the topic of immigration is rooted in the language people use to refer to undocumented immigrants. “I am a person — I am not illegal. I, as a person, can’t be illegal,” he said. He said another issue arises from the assumption that all undocumented immigrants come from a single place, while, in reality, they come from all around the world.“Forty percent of the undocumented people here have overstayed their visas,” he said. “That’s almost half who didn’t come from the border of Mexico.”Another issue stems from the citizens of the United States implicitly approving of undocumented immigrants when it is economically convenient for themselves.“We are country addicted to cheap labor,” Vargas said. “So long as we have what we need, it’s a border, it’s a wall.”One way Vargas has tried to combat the stigma surrounding undocumented immigrants is through his effort of questioning everyone, regardless of ethnicity or race, what their heritage is. Vargas said he wants everyone to understand that their ancestors moved to America for a better life and that this same reason drives immigration today, as well. “Why do people move? Do you know your own history? When Europeans or Americans move and expand, it’s courageous, it’s necessary. When Latinos move, it’s illegal — it’s a crime,” he said. Vargas has been told at various times in his life that he does not belong here, and he said he was confused as to exactly what that meant, as individuals cannot choose what country they are born into. “What did you do to deserve to be here? What are we all doing to deserve to be here? Citizenship means knowing the world doesn’t revolve around you,” he said.According to Vargas, an important action American citizens can take to combat this issue is to care about others, and to try to see life through the eyes of another.“I ask, in all the ways that we can, we show up for each other,” he said.Tags: Diversity, DSLC, Immigrationlast_img read more

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Activist discusses her experience as leader of the anti-abortion movement

first_imgThe president and founder of Live Action, a non-profit committed to ending abortion, delivered the keynote lecture of Notre Dame Right to Life’s Respect Life Week on Thursday evening in the Carey Auditorium. During the lecture, titled “Transforming the Abortion Debate,” Lila Rose spoke about her work to advance the anti-abortion movement.Rose opened her talk with an anecdote about a recent experience she had while jogging near her home in Berkeley, California.“I was going on a jog and I was running on one of these main streets … and I jogged by a really cute looking shop,” Rose said. “I stopped in and it was a clothing store … and all the sudden I see this tote bag.”The tote bag was a Planned Parenthood tote bag. Rose described it as listing all of the services Planned Parenthood claims to offer, and said she brought the bag-listed services that Planned Parenthood does not actually offer to the attention of the store’s clerk.“All of the sudden, her face, her countenance changed pretty dramatically and she said, ‘I don’t want to talk about it,’” Rose said. “I said, ‘OK, well, I just want to understand why you’re selling it here. Did you know that Planned Parenthood is actually the largest abortion provider in the country?’ And again she just said, ‘I don’t want to talk about this right now.’ I said a quick prayer and I walked out of the shop.”Rose said she was struck by how quickly the clerk’s demeanor changed and how unwilling the clerk was to have a conversation about abortion. She said she believed this anecdote was consistent with a trend of people closing their minds and refusing to have a conversation about abortion. Rose believes this closing comes from a sense of “woundedness” that originates in the aftermath of abortions, she said.Though raised in a Protestant family, Rose is now a Catholic in northern California, she said. Because she was homeschooled, Rose said, there were many books in her house. She said her “aha moment” about abortion came when she found a pro-life book, “A Handbook on Abortion,” on her parents’ shelf that detailed the practice of abortion, and that an image of an aborted fetus in the book affected her deeply.Rose said she remembered thinking, “Is this real?”Rose was inspired by the teachings of St. Mother Theresa of Calcutta, who opposed abortion, she said.“Whenever [Calcutta] gave public speeches, she would often give strong admonitions — to the United States, specifically — about abortion,” Rose said.Rose’s organization, Live Action, carries out undercover and hidden camera investigations into Planned Parenthood and other abortion providers. Rose remembered her first time going undercover, at the University of California–Los Angeles health center when she was an undergraduate, to investigate why she never saw any pregnant women on campus. When she entered the facility, pretending to be pregnant, the only option given to her was to have an abortion, Rose said.“This is why there are no pregnant women on campus,” she said. “Because of this anti-motherhood, [this] fear of our ability as women to be able to be mothers. This negative mindset about pregnancy, about motherhood, about our potential as women to be able to create life.”Rose described the work her organization carries out in detail. She said undercover investigations of Planned Parenthood have revealed that the organization does not offer all the services it claims to offer and also adheres to a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy about sexual abuse. She described a Planned Parenthood event in Seattle where women were encouraged to “shout” about their abortions.“I think behind that shout is a deep wound,” Rose said.One of the focuses of Live Action is telling the stories of various people who have previously been involved with abortions, including women who have had the procedure, abortionists and their aides. Through the work of Live Action and the stories such people are able to tell, Rose said, “hearts and minds” are starting to change.Ultimately, Rose said the debate surrounding abortion is about what constitutes a human life.“As we are fighting something so horrific, we are proclaiming something so beautiful and so good,” Rose said. “And to be truly and wholly pro-life, we proclaim the goodness of life. One of the quotes that I love is from St. Augustine, and he said that people travel the world to marvel at the height of the mountains, at the circular motions of the stars, at the vast oceans. But people pass by themselves without wondering. St. Augustine of course is saying how wonderful is the human person, made in the image and likeness of God.“How wonderful our ability, our freedom, our ability to choose, how wonderful our lives. We’re purposed for good; we’re purposed for love. And that is the heart of this battle, that’s the heart of our message.”Tags: Abortion, anti-abortion, Notre Dame Right to Life, Pro-life, Respect Life Weeklast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s upperclassmen flock to “Black and White Ball”

first_imgSaint Mary’s drew up to 700 students to the Hilton Garden Inn near campus Friday night for the College’s junior and senior winter formal.Junior Emily Beam, president of the Formal Committee, said in an email that the event was themed “Black and White Ball” because “everything looked so elegant and classy.” “We figured it would be easy to accomplish with a small budget and nice venue,” she said. “[Junior] Grace [Kelly, senior] Sam [Schickel] and I just really wanted to do something original.”Beam said she oversaw all the decision-making and logistics that went into planning an event of this caliber. “I started working with my vice presidents, Grace Kelly and Sam Schickel, at the end of last spring and we made it our goal to have the basic details of the dance already planned before meeting with our committee in the fall,” Beam said. “We searched venues, thought of themes and picked out potential dates before starting school this year. All the other details and ideas came from our committee members.”Since this is one of the only formals Saint Mary’s hosts, Beam said it was important to her to make the event work for everyone.“Personally, I feel a lot of pressure to try and make this event perfect since it’s one of the events that our student body looks forward to all year,” she said. “We had enough help from administration, our underclassmen committee members and chaperones so that there wasn’t too much work that needed done during the dance.”During the ticket sales for the formal in October, students believed the event was open to all Saint Mary’s students, not just upperclassmen. Beam said this was because she was told that the committee was required to plan one big formal for the entire school. “After a lot discussion, we got the approval from administration to have two formals in order to give more students the opportunity to attend the dance,” she said. As a result, Saint Mary’s underclassmen will have the opportunity to attend their own formal in the spring. Though it was meant to make the events more inclusive, some students expressed disappointment with the scheduling change. Sophomore Jo Ward said she will not get the opportunity to attend her formal now since she will be studying abroad next semester.“I was a little upset since [my girlfriend and I] are both going to be abroad next semester and we won’t be able to attend this year’s underclassmen formal,” she said. “Especially since they had the date in place for a little while, so when they changed it I was taken aback.” Ticket sales sold out quickly — students who did not purchase their tickets immediately after they went on sale did not receive one. However, Beam said she feels everyone who wanted a ticket eventually got one. “Tickets always sell out quickly,” Beam said. “We have an allotted number that we’re allowed to sell due to fire codes and room capacity of the venue. This year we sold roughly 700 tickets — by 5 p.m. on the first day of ticket sales, I think we sold 487 tickets. We always allow girls to return their tickets and when tickets are returned, someone else can buy them. I think the majority of people who wanted to go got tickets and were able to attend the event.”Junior Kirsten Sherman said although she had fun at formal, she felt like the theme fell short. “No one actually wore black and white, and the space didn’t play to the theme,” she said. Rumors have spread that this will be the last year Saint Mary’s hosts a formal or formals, but Beam said those comments are unfounded. “There’s always rumors that this will be ‘the last’ Saint Mary’s formal,” she said. “The reality of it is that it’s up to the student body. If we want to keep having this dance year after year, it’s important that we be respectful and follow the rules put in place by administration.”From a student perspective, Beam said she loves formal because it is a special night she gets to celebrate with her friends. From an event-planning perspective, she said formal is a way to see her hard work come to life. Beam said Saint Mary’s formal is a tradition that should be respected so that future generations can enjoy the event as well. “I think this dance went way better than we were anticipating, so now it’s really up to the underclassmen to present themselves in a proper manner so that the tradition can continue,” she said. Tags: Black and White Ball, Dance, Formal, Saint Mary’s winter formallast_img read more

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College of Business introduces Mendoza SMART to assist students in discernment process

first_imgFor the past two years, the Mendoza College of Business has been building and testing a mobile app for undergraduate advising. The application, called Mendoza SMART, allows students to explore a breadth of opportunities and aims to help with the major discernment process.Alison Levey, Mendoza’s associate director for advising services, said many students enter the college with predisposed ideas about what they might be interested in.“We feel like a lot of students come in with a very predetermined idea of what they want to major in … and we often feel like they are under-informed about all of their possibilities,” she said. “Then they self-select out of events where they might hear the thing that makes them [consider other options].”Levey said she hopes Mendoza SMART will encourage students to explore other disciplines within the college so that they enter fulfilling work after graduation.“We wanted to try and find a fun way for students to get exposed to more things — both for making their major decision … and for doing things to prepare them for the recruitment process,” Levey said. “Really, this is about broadening our students’ horizons and getting them to look at all of their options so that they make an informed, intentional decision when they choose their major.”The app presents students with challenges such as attending lectures, meeting with professors, updating LinkedIn profiles and engaging with student organizations. Upon completing these challenges, students receive points, which can later be redeemed for prizes. One of the most popular prizes that students can earn is preferential registration for one business course. In addition to challenges, the app also features advising alerts, Mendoza news and campus updates.Mark Kimmet and Diego Wang, the app’s developers, said that a mobile app seemed like the best way to reach students who are already inundated with emails.“Mobile apps are better in today’s world. … Students have smartphones in their hands that they always check, so we think this is a better tool to communicate with students [than email],” Wang said.Levey echoed the sentiment that many students feel overwhelmed by the number of emails they receive, to the point that they may begin to avoid them. She said she hopes the app will give students a more streamlined way to receive information and that it will improve dialogue between students and advisors.“[The app] is very user-friendly and straightforward and it keeps information out of email and in a compact, easy way to [access],” she said.Kimmet said the app’s communication features have been updated so that the most recent version will strengthen students’ access to advising tools.“This time around, we’ve added more availability for communication through push notifications,” he said. “This gives the undergraduate advising office the ability to send out some news about general advising and the challenges.”Kimmet and Wang also designed the app so that it is integrated with the platform “YouCanBook.me”, which will allow students to easily book advising appointments.Mendoza intents in the class of 2022 will be joining the app next week following meetings with their advisors. Levey said that, with next year’s dissolution of the First Year of Studies, the app will be used by the class of 2023 in the Fall to begin their discernment process even earlier than previous classes.Tags: mendoza college of business, Mendoza SMARTlast_img read more