By - admin

Getting into the holiday spirit with the Pomeroy Sports Centre

first_imgThe centre is offering co-ed drop in hockey for youth 8 and up, which requires no particular skill level to participate.The price to participate is $2.50 for those 8 – 18, and $3.25 for those 19 – 65. All participants must be wearing “full gear.”The drop in hockey sessions are broken into three different sections; with those aged 8 – 11 meeting at the East Arena from 10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m., aged 12 – 15 meet at the East Arena 12:00 p.m. – 1:15 p.m., while those 16 and over meet at the West Arena 12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.- Advertisement -“In addition to this, public skating sessions on the Oval have been added to the schedule,” Recreation Programmer Marissa Jordan writes. “Public skate is open to everyone but we encourage you to bring a helmet.”Finally, the Pomeroy is hosting a ‘Countdown to Christmas Skate’ on December 20 at the Oval.The family themed skate is open to all ages and will run 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.Advertisement “There will be games, prizes, a Christmas themed photo booth, and free hot chocolate!” Jordan concludes.the Christmas activities run December 20 – January 5.For more information, contact Jordan at 250 794 3262.last_img read more

By - admin

Chelsea new boy impresses again

first_imgRecent signing Patrick Bamford has continued an impressive start to his Chelsea career by scoring in another reserve match.Last week the 18-year-old striker, a pre-deadline arrival from Nottingham Forest, netted twice on his first appearance in a Blues shirt as the reserves beat Gillingham 5-4.He scored the winner from the penalty spot after being brought down himself in that game – and did exactly the same as the second string beat Fulham 3-2 on Monday afternoon.Romelu Lukaku and Ismail Seremba also scored for Chelsea, while Kerim Frei got both Fulham’s goals in the match at Cobham.Bamford was involved in his team’s second goal as his header hit the woodwork before Seremba added the finishing touch.Related story: Chelsea new boy makes great start (14 February)Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

By - admin

South African television

first_imgSet of a television advert production inCape Town.(Image: Rodger Bosch,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For morefree photos, visit the image library)South African television is broadcast in all 11 official languages, as well as in German, Hindi, Portuguese – and even in sign.The country’s first television broadcast took place in the major cities in 1975, before the first nation-wide broadcast on 6 January 1976.South Africa was therefore one of the last countries the world – and even one of the last in Africa – to access TV. This was because the apartheid government feared the effect television would have on the morals of its people – and feared more that it would dilute the state’s control over the press and radio. Indeed, television became an issue in apartheid-era whites-only elections, with the United Party campaigning under the slogan “Want TV? Vote UP!” (See Bernard Cros, Why South Africa’s Television is only Twenty Years Old: Debating Civilisation, 1958-1969)Today, South Africans now have access to a wide spectrum of local and international drama, comedy, sports and news through their televisions.Since its launch, South African television has been broadcast in colour, on the PAL system. The relatively late introduction of television to the country had its advantages, as the state-controlled South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) was able to skip the expensive transition between black-and-white and colour.The SABC’s broadcasting monopoly ended in 1986 when the subscription-based MNet was launched.Since the arrival of democracy in 1994, South Africans have seen a number of new television channels introduced by both the SABC and other private operators.South Africa’s four television providers are:The South African Broadcasting CorporationMultichoicee.tvTopTVThe SABC, e.tv and MNet all broadcast across Africa.A fifth television provider, Walking on Water Television, or WowTV, is scheduled to launch before March 2012 with a variety of Christian-based programming.South African Broadcasting CorporationSouth Africa’s public broadcaster, the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC), receives funding through both licence fees and advertising. The SABC broadcasts on three domestic channels, with a mixed entertainment and public service mandate.SABC websiteSABC1 is the most watched television channel in South Africa. The channel broadcasts in a wide range of languages, carrying news, entertainment and sports.SABC1 websiteSABC2 also carries programming in a range of languages, including most of the SABC’s Afrikaans programming. The channel has a high proportion of locally produced programming.SABC2 websiteSABC3 runs most of the SABC’s English content, including many American and British comedies and dramas.SABC3 websiteSABCAfrica was the SABC’s news and entertainment channel, broadcast to the rest of the continent. The service ceased in 2008.MultichoiceMultichoice provides premium-service television to paying subscribers. Its main offerings are MNet, South Africa’s first pay-TV channel, and DStv, which offers a large number of channels available in different “bouquets”.Multichoice websiteMNet, started in 1986, is a subscription channel broadcast on an encoded signal that requires a decoder for viewing. The content is a mix of children’s entertainment, drama, sport and movies, most sourced from the US and, to a lesser extent, the UK. The channel does not carry any news programming, although it does run some current affairs programmes such as the well-regarded Carte Blanche.MNet websiteDStv is Multichoice’s digital satellite service, launched in 1995. The subscription-based service is available in South Africa and throughout Africa.DStv carries a wide variety of channels, ranging from South African produced content, to international syndicated content, sports and news. There are also various “bouquets”, a bundle of channels available for catering to some of South Africa’s expatriate communities.DStv has recently introduced high-definition and mobile television services, although subscribers wishing to view these will have to buy new hardware.DStv websiteDStv channels with South African or African content are:AfrikaMagic – an entertainment channel dedicated to African programmingChannel O – African popular music channelCNBC Africa – Africa’s first 24-hour international business channel, providing real-time information and analysis about African business and Africa’s financial marketsFin24 – an interactive service offering local and international financial news and indicatorsKyknet – entertainment programming in the Afrikaans languageMindset Learn – educational channel based on the South African curriculum and aimed at grades 10 to 12, covering the maths, science and English syllabusesMK – popular music in AfrikaansNews24 – local, regional and international news, sport, entertainment, science and technology, finance, health and weather coverageParliamentary Service – live and recorded sessions from South Africa’s parliamentWeather Channel – detailed weather information on 35 cities and towns in South Africa, as well as in Africa and elsewhereMultichoice had a Web TV service, Kuduclub, for South Africans living further afield. This ended in March 2011.Multichoice websiteE.tvLaunched in 1998, e.tv is South Africa’s only free-to-air television channel. The station carries a mix of news, sports and entertainment. E.tv broadcasts mainly in English, although it does carry some programming in other languages in order to comply with its licence requirements.E.tv websiteTopTVTopTV, run by On Digital Media, launched its pay-TV services in May 2010. Subscribers have a choice of seven bouquets, ranging from R99 to R249 per month. The equipment bundle was affordable, and has become significantly cheaper still in the months since.The introduction of competition in the pay market sparked a reaction from DStv, which wasted no time in launching a cheaper alternative, with fewer channels, to its premium package. It also offered new subscribers a cheaper equipment bundle, which has also dropped in price since its launch.TopTV websiteRelated articlesThe media in South AfricaSouth Africa onlineRadio in South AfricaSouth Africa’s commercial radio stationsSouth Africa’s public broadcasting radio stationsSouth Africa’s community radio stationslast_img read more

By - admin

Science and technology

first_imgSouth Africa has a respected and world-class science and technology community that, over many decades, has pioneered globally significant and successful new ideas, techniques and technologies.These include the complex techniques to produce fuels and useful chemicals from raw coal, pioneering steel production, the extreme engineering and chemistry required to extract minerals from increasingly miserly reefs of the deepest mines in the world, medical expertise that not only saw the country pioneering the world’s first heart transplant, but makes South Africa-trained doctors in demand – and working – all over the world, and in recent years, a thriving space science industry.The government body responsible for the sector is the Department of Science and Technology (DST). Its budget over the Medium Term Expenditure Framework is R16.6-billion, of which R4.96-billion has been allocated to the 2012/13 financial year.Of this smaller amount, R2.6-billion or 53% is allocated to public entities (Africa Institute of South Africa R33-million, the Academy of Science for South Africa R13-million, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research R737-million, the Human Sciences Research Council R214-million, the National Research Foundation R1.07-million, National Space Agency R95-million and TIA R455 million).Of the remainder R1.94-billion is allocated to the DST-directed projects (implemented by institutions that perform research and development) and R397-million to the running costs of the department.The allocations to DST public entities rise from R2.6-billion to R2.9-billion between 2012/13 and 2014/15 at an annual average growth rate of 5%.Research and developmentSouth Africa’s Research and Development Strategy, launched in 2002, aims to enhance the National System of Innovation, a cluster of interacting public and private organisations focused on nurturing and developing science and technology in South Africa, with the specific aim of accelerating economic growth.A survey released in October 2010 by the Human Sciences Research Council reveals that the gross domestic expenditure on research and development (R&D) was R21-billion, a nominal increase of R2.4-billion from the R18.6-billion recorded for 2007/08. These are the latest available figures.The 2008/09 expenditure represents a 12.9% nominal increase, although it fell a little behind the increase in the nominal GDP of 13.2% over the corresponding period. As a consequence, R&D expenditure, expressed as a percentage of GDP, dropped slightly from 0.93% in 2007/08 to 0.92% in 2008/09.The DST constantly develops strategies to ensure South Africa in new areas of knowledge and technology. Strategies to develop nanotechnology, astronomy indigenous knowledge, and intellectual property, have been developed, derived from publicly funded research.BiotechnologySouth Africa’s National Biotechnology Strategy (NBS) was launched in 2001 to stimulate the growth of a local biotech industry, following similar successful programmes in other developing countries, such as Cuba, Brazil and China.Its initiatives include biotechnology regional innovation centres (Brics), created to act as instruments for the implementation of the NBS. The country’s four Brics are:BioPADCape Biotech TrustLIFElabPlant Biotechnology Innovation Centre (PlantBio)The Brics focus on a number of different biotech disciplines, including human and animal health, biopharmaceuticals, industrial bioprocessing, mining biotechnology, bioinformatics and plant biotechnology.One of the challenges facing the South African biotechnology sector is the public’s suspicion and lack of understanding and knowledge of the technology’s benefits. For this reason the NBS initiated the Public Understanding of Biotechnology programme, which provides South Africans with information to participate meaningfully in debates about biotechnology, and to make informed decisions.NanotechnologySouth Africa’s National Nanotechnology Strategy, launched in April 2006, focuses on the essential building blocks of nanoscience: synthesis, characterisation and fabrication. The strategy aims to increase the number of nanotechnology characterisation centres in South Africa, with an investment of R170-million over three years – R15-million in 2005/06, R30-million in 2006/2007, and R120-million in 2007/2008.Known as “the technology of the very small” – about 1/80 000 of the diameter of a human hair – nanotechnology is made up of a wide range of technologies, techniques and multidisciplinary research efforts for application in a range of cross-cutting industries and activities. These include aerospace, manufacturing and automotive industries; energy conversion, storage and distribution; the hydrogen economy; chemicals; electronics and information processing; as well as biotechnology and medicines.South African industry and researchers have been key players in nanotechnology and the practical application of nanoscience for a number of years. One example is Sasol’s chemical processing by catalysis.The strategy recognises that it is essential for South African scientists to develop their ability to derive more benefits from new generations of nanotechnology-based products emerging in the world today. It aims to position the country as a global player in this emerging discipline, and seeks to strengthen the integrated development focus of the government.The strategy’s main objectives are to:support long-term nanoscience research that will lead to a fundamental understanding of the design, synthesis, characterisation, modelling and fabrication of nanomaterialsupport the creation of new and novel devices for application in various areasdevelop the required HR and supporting infrastructurestimulate new developments in technology missions such, as material for advanced manufacturing, nanobiomaterial for biotechnology, precious metal-based nanoparticles for resource-based industries, and advanced material for information and communications technologiesSpace scienceNational Space AgencyThe National Space Agency (Sansa) was formed in December 2009 by the National Space Agency Act of 2008 (PDF).It’s described as the country’s government body for the promotion and use of space. It also fosters cooperation in space-related activities and research in space science, seeks to advance scientific engineering through human capital, and supports the creation of an environment conducive to the industrial development of space technologies within the framework of the national government.It became operational in April 2011.Sansa’s focus areas are:Earth observationSpace engineeringSpace operationsSpace scienceHuman capital developmentPublic engagementSquare Kilometre ArrayIn mid-2012 South Africa was named one of the two co-hosts of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA0, sharing the project with Australia.The SKA will be the world’s largest radio telescope when complete. The Southern African portion will be centred in the Karoo in an area that is protected by law from developments that could cause radio interference.South Africa will host the greater part – about 70% – of the instrument, while the remainder will be built in Australia.The SKA will have five key research areas:Investigating galaxy evolution, cosmology and dark energyStrong-field tests of gravity using pulsars and black holesInvestigating the origin and evolution of cosmic magnetismThe cradle of life searching for life and planetsProbing the dark ages – the first black holes and starslast_img read more

By - admin

Big fests for big beasts

first_imgAn even more unusual sight: ahumpbacked whale frolicking in the watersoff Hermanus. The town’s harbour isnormally visited by southern right whales.(Image: South African Tourism) Hermanus has possibly the bestland-based whale-watching in the world,as the southern right whiles come to mateand calve in its harbour in June andNovember, often approaching meremetres to the shore.(Image: South African Tourism) During this year’s festival fishermenlanded their catch at the Hermanus OldHarbour for the first time in 50 years.(Image: Lianda Beyers-Cronje)Jennifer SternSummer is almost here and the coastal regions of South Africa are bracing themselves for the long-awaited onslaught of tourists who come to soak up the sun, lie around on the sand and frolic in the sea. It’s a kind of crazy time, when it’s almost impossible to find a room in a hotel, parking near the beach, or a table at a restaurant. Crazy, but welcome, because that’s what keeps the tourism sector going.High season is all very well, but the extremes of occupancy between peak and low season is a bit much. So most coastal towns dream up innovative ways of spreading the load by luring tourists to their towns in the off season.Plettenberg Bay in the Western Cape tried to get in on the act by offering visitors the opportunity to leave their shoes behind and celebrate a Barefoot Festival, which seemed like a great idea but never really made it. Possibly because it coincided with the Hermanus Whale Festival. Bad idea.Whales, penguins and oystersThe Hermanus Whale Festival is one of South Africa’s oldest seaside festivals, and the inspiration for many animal-based celebrations that have tried to follow in its wake. The Simons Town Penguin Festival in Cape Town seemed primed to be a winner but, despite flapping its wings vigorously, it never got off the ground.More successfully, Knysna serves up a few million oysters in July at the annual Oyster Festival, which gets gourmets, cyclists, runners, music fans and art lovers pouring into the Garden Route town in the middle of winter.In August, Hout Bay Harbour in Cape Town reverberates with the thrum of boat engines as gnarled fishermen compete with each other to land the biggest snoek during the Snoek Derby. The spectators are treated to a range of seafood – including snoek, of course. Up the West Coast, the annual Lamberts Bay Crayfish Festival, held in April, is a celebration of this tasty crustacean. But neither of these fests matches the success of the Knysna Oyster Festival.Still on a fishy note, just on the other side of Walker Bay from Hermanus, the little town of Gansbaai is cashing in on its self-proclaimed (but well-founded) status as the shark cage diving capital of the world by holding a shark festival a few weeks after the whale festival. The Great White Shark Festival, which ran from 23 to 26 October, is an opportunity to showcase sharks’ essential place in the marine ecosystem, their vulnerable status, and – of course – to try to play down their exaggerated reputation as mindless killers.Sharks, as anyone who paid attention at the festival could tell you, are superb predators, but they do not make a habit of munching on people. Of course, it’s also an opportunity to get lots of people to Gansbaai, to eat, drink and be merry. But it has a long way to go if it wants to compete with its neighbour’s whale festival.In the Hermanus harbourHermanus is fortunate in having possibly the best land-based whale watching in the world. Southern right whales come in to Walker Bay to mate and calve between June and November, and they hang around in the calm waters incredibly close to the shore.They are also surprisingly numerous. A half-hour stroll along the scenic cliff-top walk at the right time of year is virtually guaranteed to yield a dozen or more separate sightings, and whales often swim mere metres from the breakwater at the New Harbour.So in 1992 when Neville Sheriff, Bruce van der Spuy and Basil Clarke-Browne decided to boost tourism to their town by holding a festival, its theme was a no-brainer. It started off relatively low key, with few people turning up for the inaugural celebration. Since then it’s gone from strength to strength, and the 17th festival, held on the weekend of 24 to 28 September 2008, was a runaway success.It’s estimated that the town swelled from its low-season population of about 80 000 people to 122 000 – a figure comparable to the Christmas high of between 120 000 and 140 000.“It’s the most successful festival we’ve had in many years,” says Annette Theron, one of the organisers. “And it brought millions of rands of revenue into the town.”Chris von Ulmenstein, the owner of a guest house in Hermanus, agrees.“The Whale Festival has gone from strength to strength over the 12 years Whale Cottage has been operating in Hermanus, as measured by our occupancy. We were fully booked not only for the four days of the Whale Festival, but also the days earlier in the week leading up to the festival.”Art, music and sustainabilityThe fest included the usual art and music events, including the Whale of a Wine Festival at Hermanusietersfontein Wine Estate in the Hemel en Aarde Valley. An arts ramble attracted 32 artists and 19 galleries.And there was music for young and old, with Karen Zoid, Cofield Mundi and others bringing in the crowds. On a more – well, mature – note, the Bats played to a full house, most of whom probably came just to see for themselves that all the band members really were still alive.But there was a more serious side to the event. While the whales were far more fortunate than the Knysna oysters, the Hout Bay snoek or the Lamberts Bay crayfish, their fishy neighbours did end up in the pot. For the first time since 1958, fishing boats came in to the Old Harbour, which is now a museum, and offloaded their catch for the Slofish Fare.Teams of four to six people competed to make the best fish dish on the day, using only fish on the South African Sustainable Seafood Initiative list. It was a celebration of heritage and food, but also a reminder that seafood harvesting is potentially devastating, and that it needs to be managed sustainably.Sustainability was an important theme of the event. The Sustainable Lifestyle Expo, run by the Overstrand Conservation Foundation, took up most of Market Square, and was the focal point of the festival. Forty-five stalls ranging from tiny one-person sustainable endeavours to Woolworths and eco-friendly building companies, took the opportunity to show off their organic and environmentally friendly produce and products.But it really is about whales. The Hermanus Whale Crier was out in full cry blowing out his coded messages informing festival-goers of the best whale-watching vantage points. Although that seemed almost superfluous, as the whales were to be seen almost everywhere.“They know they must be on their best behaviour, breaching and swimming close to shore, to treat all the visitors to Hermanus,” Von Ulmenstein laughingly suggested.Theron agreed, adding that the whales seemed to be coming earlier every year, and staying longer. And arriving in greater numbers – more than could be accounted for by simple population increase.“Perhaps,” she mused, “they know that we don’t hunt whales any more, and they’re – I don’t know – saying thank you?”“Or maybe,” a bystander added, “they’re training us. Training us to be more environmentally aware by rewarding us with closer and more frequent sightings as we start to behave more responsibly.”Now there’s a thought. Let’s hope we learn the lesson well.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Mary Alexander at [email protected] linksHermanus Whale FestivalHermanus.co.zaHermanusSouthAfrica.comGansbaai Great White Shark FestivalLamberts’s Bay Crayfish FestivalHout Bay Snoek DerbyKnysna Oyster FestivalCape Town TourismWhale Cottagelast_img read more

By - admin

OSU Hay Day June 23

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Hay producers who want boost their profit potential and stay up to date on hay harvest techniques can plan to attend a workshop on June 23, led by experts from Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.The Hay Day program covers a broad range of hay production topics including mowing, tedding, raking and baling hay, said Christine Gelley, an OSU Extension educator. Bale wrapping will also be a focus of the program, and implement dealers will have featured equipment on display, she said.The techniques taught at the workshop are important for hay producers because they can influence how effectively a producer can protect their hay from the elements, including moisture, which can impact the nutritional quality of the hay, Gelley said.“We will talk about various techniques for bale wrapping to protect the hay during storage,” she said. “Protective storage helps preserve the quality of the hay for future use.”Moisture was an issue last spring for hay producers, many of whom experienced delayed harvests due to excess rain in June that kept them out of their fields, Gelley said.“If harvest is delayed, hay can become over-mature, which could negatively impact the nutritive value and number of cuttings possible during the season, making it even more important to preserve the supply of good quality hay on hand,” she said.Demonstrations, tourThe workshop is from 4 to 8:30 p.m. at the Eastern Agricultural Research Station, 16870 Township Road 126, in Belle Valley. The event is free and includes a meal, but registration is required by June 9, Gelley said.Participants will also see demonstrations using harvesting equipment, learn various harvesting and storage techniques, and take a farm tour of the agricultural research station, Gelley said.To reach the Eastern Agricultural Research Station, take exit 28 off I-77. Turn south on State Route 21. Go east (left) on State Route 215 for about one mile. Then turn right onto Bond Ridge Road (a township road) and look for signs.The facility is one of eight OARDC outlying agricultural research stations located around Ohio.For more information or to register, contact Gelley at 740-732-56810 or [email protected]last_img read more

By - admin

Jeremy Goyings, July 11

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We had an excellent wheat year. Most fields went in the 90s. One field was as high as 115 and our lowest was 73 bushels. We felt pretty good about the whole range. We used a different herbicide for broadleaf control on the 73-bushel field. It was supposed to be safe but we feel like we hurt it and timing is important with that. And we definitely saw a difference between fields with split-applied nitrogen. We split-applied 190 acres and everything else just got one shot because the weather changed and it got cold. It was early, but it turned out that it made 10 bushels per acre and in some places 15 where we split-applied. We also went a little early on the Prosaro pass because it was supposed to rain. Then it didn’t rain and I waited until the head was fully exposed like what you really want and then applied Prosaro on the rest of the wheat. I think that later application made another 10 bushels. That 115-bushel field had split-applied N and the late pass of Prosaro. I think that made a big difference. We learned a lot with this year’s wheat crop.Straw was extremely heavy. We pulled more straw off than we ever have before. We had a little over four big bales per acre averaging over 900 pounds. Every barn we have is stuffed clear to the doors.The quality was all excellent. We had test weight as high as 62 pounds and a lot of it was in the 60s. We put out about 450 acres of double-crops. The first ones are out and you can row them now. They are going to need a drink here pretty soon. We got a tenth on Friday and they are going to need some more rain here pretty quickly.There is very little corn tasseling here. A nice rain soon would be worth millions. On half of the beans the weed control is holding up pretty nicely and half we have ragweed breaking through.last_img read more

By - admin

Unity Homes Combines Prefab with Energy Efficiency

first_imgLike many builders, Tedd Benson and his team at Bensonwood Homes have taken an active interest in the emerging market for energy-efficient homes. In addition to developing panelized construction techniques and producing many custom timber frame commercial and residential buildings since its founding in 1974, Bensonwood built a home in Norwich, Vermont, to the Passivhaus standard.The Passivhaus project was instructive, Benson noted in a recent email to GreenBuildingAdvisor, not only because the building maximized energy performance as designed, but because it highlighted a performance feature – the Passivhaus standard for airtightness – that could be applied cost-effectively to other projects. The most visible of those “other projects” is Unity Homes, a separate homebuilding company that offers four basic designs, relies heavily on prefabrication, and builds its homes to meet or exceed the Passivhaus airtightness requirement: 0.6 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals pressure difference. Passivhaus certification is optionalBenson, who is chief of Unity, makes a point of noting that while airtightness and energy efficiency are virtues of Unity’s houses, Passivhaus certification is not a requirement.“Because of how our building systems work, and our off-site fabrication precision and control, we decided to make the (Passivhaus) airtightness requirement the Unity Homes standard,” Benson explained. “But we did not decide that all of our homes will be PH!”Other minimum performance standards for Unity include wall insulation to R-35 and roof insulation to R-44. For now, at least, distribution is geographically limitedBenson says that while most of the company’s focus is on the Northeast, the plan is to expand production to other parts of the country with the help of additional partners and investors. And with expansion should come economies of scale, Benson adds, that will help drive down costs. Still, the current prices offer good value, he says.“We know we’re starting out well enough in pricing that these homes will be competitive with very inferior conventional alternatives in many markets.”center_img Four basic styles, one airtightness standardBy the time Benson announced the company’s launch, in an October 9 post on this blog site, “The New House Rules,” the company’s first two homes were already in production.The Unity lineup includes a two-story traditional style home, the Tradd, offered in configurations ranging from two to four bedrooms; a single-story cottage, Xyla, in configurations ranging from one to three bedrooms; a two-story Swedish-inspired home, Värm, available with two to four bedrooms; and the modern-style Zum, a single-story with two to four bedrooms.Prices cited on the Unity Homes website exclude land, permits, site improvements, taxes, and shipping and onsite assembly charges for locations more than 50 miles from the company factory, in Walpole, New Hampshire. Unity has tried to keep prices relatively affordable. A 2,056-sq.-ft. configuration called Tradd 212, with two bedrooms and two and a half baths, for example, starts at $339,500.The Zum line, meanwhile, is designed for maximum passive solar benefit and tends to be a little more costly per square foot. It starts at $298,500 for a 1,594-sq.-ft. two-bedroom, two-bath called the Zum 212. And though slightly smaller than the Tradd 212, the Zum 233 – a 1,773-sq.-ft. three-bedroom, two-bath – starts at $373,250.last_img read more