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Latest: Wigan 0 QPR 0

first_imgQPR made a solid start to the Championship play-off semi-final first leg at the DW Stadium, where Armand Traore and Junior Hoilett were both named in the starting line-up.Wigan’s only early chance fell to Gary Caldwell, who headed straight at keeper Rob Green from Jordi Gomez’s cross.At the other end, Gary O’Neil had an effort blocked after being set up by Charlie Austin.Roared on by more than 3,000 travelling fans, Rangers have so far defended in numbers when needed and looked to hit on the counter-attack when possible. Wigan: Carson, Caldwell, Maloney, Gomez, McManaman, McArthur, Boyce, Beausejour, Perch, Kiernan, Fortune. Subs: Al Habsi, McClean, Espinoza, Barnett, Maynard, Waghorn, Collison. QPR: Green, Simpson, Onuoha, Dunne, Hill, Hoilett, Barton, O’Neil, Traore, Morrison, Austin. Subs: Murphy, Carroll, Yun, Doyle, Hughes, Henry, Kranjcar.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Raiders long snapper tears his ACL, so who’s next?

first_imgRaiders long snapper Andrew DePaola tore his ACL early in the first quarter of Monday night’s season opener and he will miss the rest of the season, a source told the Bay Area News Group.DePaola suffered the injury during a Johnny Townsend punt with 6:20 left in the first quarter. After the 55-yard boot, DePaola was examined on the Raiders’ sideline medical table and later ruled out for the game.Tight end Lee Smith handled long-snapping duties for the majority of Monday’s game without major …last_img read more

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How did 49ers tryouts impact post-Garoppolo quarterback corps?

first_imgSANTA CLARA – Tuesday’s quarterback auditions at 49ers headquarters fell incomplete, so to speak, as no one immediately got signed.Thus, C.J. Beathard and untested backup Nick Mullens are the QB tandem the 49ers figure to deploy, at least for this Sunday’s game at the Los Angeles Chargers, in the wake of Jimmy Garoppolo’s season-ending knee injury.Beathard went 1-4 as a rookie starter last season before Garoppolo’s ascension. Mullens has been working on the practice squad since last year as …last_img read more

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Big Science Blind to Its Scientism

first_imgBig Science loves scientism, but the view that science is the most reliable path to knowledge suffers a fatal flaw: it is self-refuting.Advocates of scientism today claim the sole mantle of rationality, frequently equating science with reason itself. Yet it seems the very antithesis of reason to insist that science can do what it cannot, or even that it has done what it demonstrably has not. As a scientist, I would never deny that scientific discoveries can have important implications for metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics, and that everyone interested in these topics needs to be scientifically literate. But the claim that science and science alone can answer longstanding questions in these fields gives rise to countless problems…..Of all the fads and foibles in the long history of human credulity, scientism in all its varied guises — from fanciful cosmology to evolutionary epistemology and ethics — seems among the more dangerous, both because it pretends to be something very different from what it really is and because it has been accorded widespread and uncritical adherence. Continued insistence on the universal competence of science will serve only to undermine the credibility of science as a whole. The ultimate outcome will be an increase of radical skepticism that questions the ability of science to address even the questions legitimately within its sphere of competence. One longs for a new Enlightenment to puncture the pretensions of this latest superstition. – Austin L. Hughes, “The Folly of Scientism,” The New Atlantis, Fall 2012When we say that scientism is self-refuting, we mean that scientism itself cannot be validated by the scientific method (9/08/16). If one thinks that science is the sole path to reliable knowledge, therefore, one would have to abandon scientism. Let’s doubt that claim for a moment. Could scientism be confirmed by the scientific method? A researcher lays out all pathways to knowledge and tests them according to the hypothesis that science produces the most reliable knowledge. Why wouldn’t science come up the winner? Wouldn’t a positive result confirm scientism’s superiority?Actually, it cannot. One would have to assume scientism to confirm it by the scientific method. For one thing, there is no scientific method used by all scientists. The researcher would have to arbitrarily pick one method to assume it represents science. Then, the method is not itself objective, as if a machine could turn a crank and get a result. Inputs must be chosen. Results must be interpreted. And in order to run some kind of scientific method, one would have to assume many things: the constancy of the laws of nature, the reliability of the senses, the validity of thought and the laws of logic, the validity of induction, and more – none of which can be tested by science. Scientism also fails to address many of the most important aspects of human thought: love, honesty, courage, and morality. To assume that some method could show these values provide the best strategy, one would be assuming pragmatism – a philosophy, not a finding of science. Scientism is not a statement of science. It is a statement of philosophy about science. (For more on self-refuting science, see the 1/19/14 entry, “Materialists shoot themselves in the foot.”)Despite these well-known weaknesses of scientism, Big Science and Big Media operate under the myth that science provides a superior method of knowledge generation. In some limited fields, it does. Observable, repeatable questions about magnetic induction, chemical reactions and genetic sequences can be repeated in other labs. But many scientific “findings” today are one-time occurrences, or matters of theory concerning unobservable reality, or matters of consensus. The myth of scientism was exploded decades ago by Kuhn, Feyerabend and other philosophers of science. Because Big Science cannot defend its superiority except in certain realms (like how to get a lander on Mars), it needs to be treated like a special interest group often motivated by dependence on taxpayer money.Here are examples of how Big Science and Big Media continue to delude themselves into thinking science pre-empts all other forms of truth-seeking.Divining science (Science Magazine). Andrew Robinson critiques Francesca Rochberg’s new book, Before Nature: Cuneiform Knowledge and the History of Science, giving grudging respect to the historian’s contention that ancient Babylonians were doing science in their world, despite being saturated with mythology and divination. Rochberg thinks that by trying to discern orderly laws in nature, their flawed methods were premonitions of modern science. “Before Nature‘s formidable erudition will fascinate cuneiformists,” he says, “while daunting nonspecialists and disturbing scientists, who will likely recoil from regarding divination as part of science.” One follow-up question he avoids is whether any techniques of modern science amount to divination (e.g., 5/21/16).Take the long view (Ian L. Boyd in Nature). Disgusted with the outside world’s “post-truth politics,” Boyd sees Big Science’s job as making research more “relevant.” Relevant to what? Apparently, politics. Boyd would apparently be happy to see Big Science run the government.This is not the world of the laboratory bench or the individual theoretician. It is one in which system models are being continually refined on the basis of big, open data about the system’s state and its responses. This will blur the boundaries between experimentalists and those who run the policies — because a policy becomes a hypothesis. And it will turn science back from the path of being perceived as an irrelevant domain of the intellectual elite. Recent growth in anti-science views on both sides of the Atlantic suggests that this change is imperative.How to check if you’re in a news echo chamber – and what to do about it (Tom Stafford in The Conversation). Stafford comes the closest to recognizing the problem with scientism in Big Science. The psychologist and cognitive scientist at the University of Sheffield points a stern finger at his fellow liberals:If you were surprised by the result of the Brexit vote in the UK or by the Trump victory in the US, you might live in an echo chamber – a self-reinforcing world of people who share the same opinions as you. Echo chambers are a problem, and not just because it means some people make incorrect predictions about political events. They threaten our democratic conversation, splitting up the common ground of assumption and fact that is needed for diverse people to talk to each other.After this promising opening, however, Stafford returns to the assumption that political bias is a neurological consequence of our biology. Built-in bias (homophily) and confirmation bias are hardwired into our brains. He fails to notice that the belief in scientific materialism undermines his own beliefs about echo chambers. So much for the ‘truth-seeking’ he writes about. Nevertheless, he offers some tips on recognizing whether you are in an echo chamber, and things you can do to get out of one.How to overcome end-point bias in the media to make smarter decisions (Science Daily). This article avoids political positions, recognizing “end-point bias” in both liberal and conservative camps. Nevertheless, the research written for Taylor & Francis Group (a sociology publisher) assumes science can solve it. Why not parents? Why not theologians or philosophers or guidance counselors with common sense? The article’s own liberal bias shows through where an experiment is done on how to change people’s minds to favor the scientific consensus on global warming. Why not run an opposite but equal experiment? The authors’ scientism and groupthink reveals itself. The authors already know they are right. The communication must go one-way, fixing misconceptions to prove to people that climate change is real. Shouldn’t objective scientists consider the possibility that the consensus is wrong? They seem blind to their own end-point bias.Super-you: You have a superstitious mind – to protect you (Graham Lawton at New Scientist). Superstition is hard-wired into human nature, Lawton argues. He can certainly point to a lot of evidence this is true; huge crowds of people doing weird things that have no basis in evidence. But to extricate himself from the problem, he would have to advance to a higher plane of consciousness that allows him to talk down to others. That’s scientism. His Yoda hat on, he pontificates about why evolution produced superstition to protect us.Accurate numbers are hard to come by, but even conservative estimates suggest that half a billion people around the world (and counting) are non-religious.But are they, really? Among the scientists who study the cognitive foundations of religious belief, there is a widespread consensus that atheism is only skin-deep. Scratch the surface of a non-believer and you’ll find a writhing nest of superstition and quasi-religion.That’s because evolution has endowed us with cognitive tendencies that, while useful for survival, also make us very receptive to religious concepts. “There are some core intuitions that make supernatural belief easy for our brains,” says psychologist Ara Norenzayan at the University of British Columbia in Canada.Why, it’s so pervasive that “Many experiments have shown that supernatural thoughts are easy to invoke even in people who consider themselves sceptics.” Does he ever consider that his own ideas might be superstitious? Not really. “If you’re still under the illusion that you are a rational creature, that really is wishful thinking.” But you can trust me; I’m a rational creature, he thinks. And he will sell you a vacation home on the Isle of DeBris, too.Super-you: How to harness your inner braggart (Tiffany O’Callaghan in New Scientist). In this episode of “Super-you,” O-Callaghan declares everybody as a braggart, thinking other people are idiots. You can predict our comeback: she’s just bragging. Look at her bravado, presuming to tell you what to do:So how can we preserve the good while avoiding the downsides? Different strategies and training programmes do exist for overcoming our inbuilt biases. Most begin by simply making people aware of them and how they can affect our decision-making.Yes, indeed; practice might make you as humble as she is.Finding the unknowns in the universe (Phys.org). Buried in this positivistic article about the potential for major astronomical discoveries in algorithms that can sift through big data, comes this warning from Ray Norris: “This is a very efficient way of answering the known unknowns. Sadly, it is useless at finding the unknown unknowns. We only receive answers to the questions that we ask, and not to the questions that we didn’t know we ought to ask.” From there, Norris jumps back into positivism, thinking about all the new questions his software can ask. He needs to re-read his quote. If humans don’t know what they ought to ask, the software humans write isn’t going to do much better.AAAS reaches out to theology students (Science Magazine). In this final example, we see Michaela Jarvis exercising Big Science’s predilection to see everyone else as a sick lab rat who needs fixing through scientism. Doesn’t the subtitle sound noble? “Program fosters dialogue between scientific and religious communities.” Ah, but we find that the purpose is to fix the religious communities who don’t yet understand the superiority of science. If they were more scientifically literate, they wouldn’t be so religious, you see. Would the scientists in a dialogue session seriously listen to someone presenting the gospel to them? Doubtful; they would be too interested in waiting for a break to help the theology student learn to “appreciate science.”To most effectively connect with seminaries, AAAS partnered with the Association of Theological Schools, an accrediting association for graduate schools that train clergy. The pilot project, involving 10 seminaries representing a wide variety of Christian religious traditions, was designed to help professors incorporate relevant science into at least two of each seminary’s core courses. The participating schools also set out to organize at least one campus-wide event each to explore the relevance of science to theological education.It’s a sales gimmick, not a true dialogue. Success of the program is measured by how much the theology students change, not by whether the scientists learn to abandon scientism. Imagine one of the theologians asking back, ‘What do you say we talk about the relevance of theology to science.’ Predictable response: “Huh?” Short quizzical look. ‘Uh, yeah; right. Say, want to hear about how the AAAS is expanding its program to include rabbinical schools?’The delusions of grandeur run so deep, some of these Big Science advocates see themselves as the only ones who can save the world. Slowly, as they preach, their pedestals sink into the quicksand.Listen to this podcast on ID the Future, “How the Consensus Can Blind Science.” It talks about Harvard astronomer Avi Loeb’s sinking feeling after visiting Chichen Itza’s astrological temples and learning about the Mayans’ success at predicting eclipses and planetary motions. He wondered if modern cosmology might be just as deluded as the worldview of the ancient Mayan priests, who used extremely careful observational “science” to tell them when to go to war, and how many humans to sacrifice to the gods. The Mayan astrologers were highly regarded in their society, just like modern scientists are in ours, Loeb mentions with a groan.(Visited 128 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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South Africa to bid farewell to Senzo Meyiwa at Moses Mabhida Stadium

first_img31 October 2014South Africa will bid farewell to Bafana Bafana and Orlando Pirates Football Club captain Senzo Meyiwa at the 60 000-seat Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban on Saturday, 1 November.Thousands of mourners are expected to flock to the stadium on the day to say “ndlelanhle’ to one of South Africa’s celebrated sports heroes who was shot dead during an alleged robbery in Johannesburg last Sunday night.Meyiwa, who has been afforded an official provincial funeral by the KwaZulu- Natal provincial government, will be laid to rest at Chesterville’s “Heroes Acre’ cemetery.Durban newspaper the Daily News reported on Thursday that KZN Social Development MEC, Weziwe Thusi, and Sports MEC, Ntombikayise Sabhida-Saphetha, spent much of Wednesday at the Meyiwa family home in Umlazi, a township just outside Durban.Speaking to the newspaper, Meyiwa family spokesman, Siyabonga Miya, said there would be a free train service for mourners on the day of the funeral. The train will leave uMlazi for Moses Mabhida Stadium at 8am sharp.On Friday, a memorial service for Meyiwa will be held at the Durban City Hall at 12noon, hosted by the KZN provincial government.Gauteng memorial serviceOn Thursday, 30 October, Gauteng residents flocked to the Standard Bank Arena in Johannesburg to remember Meyiwa, who spent much of his sporting life at Orlando Pirates, and two other sports personalities, 800m track star Mbulaeni Mulaudzi and welterweight boxer Phindile Mwelase, who passed away in the same week.The memorial service was attended by top government officials, sports personalities and the general public. Addressing mourners at the memorial service, Sports Minister Fikile Mbalula said justice will be done to bring Meyiwa’s killers to book.“This nation will never be at ease until we’ve found them, and the machinery of justice is grinding. Each one of us has the responsibility because somewhere, somehow, someone knows who killed Senzo Meyiwa.’Bafana Bafana coach Shakes Mashaba urged the nation to celebrate the life of Meyiwa. He said Meyiwa was a “happy young man’ who gave so much to his country.“Senzo was a player that was never sad; look at all his pictures – you will never see one picture where Senzo is unhappy or sad. He had a positive energy which was always good for the national team. We have to celebrate his life, and make sure we carry the legacy he left behind.’Senzo Meyiwa funeral arrangementsAnnouncing Meyiwa’s funeral arrangement on Orlando Pirates’ website , club chairman Irvin Khoza said Meyiwa was like a son to him. He said Meyiwa came to Orlando Pirates in his mid-teens and joined the Pirates academy as a 13-year-old. He broke through the ranks into the first team but for years played second fiddle to other goalkeepers. After patiently biding his time, Meyiwa asserted himself as the first choice keeper in 2011 and eventually captained his club side.His leadership credentials also led to him becoming Bafana Bafana captain and first choice goalkeeper under new coach Shakes Mashaba after initially replacing the injured Itumeleng Khune.In his final match, Meyiwa guided Pirates to a 4-1 win over Ajax Cape Town in the Telkom Knockout quarterfinal on Saturday at the Orlando Stadium.PSL fixtures postponedOn Thursday, 30 October, the Premier Soccer League Executive Committee (Exco) announced that all fixtures that were supposed to place this weekend have been postponed till further notice.“A decision was taken to postpone all Absa Premiership and National First Division (NFD) fixtures scheduled for this weekend.“This was done following discussions between the League, title sponsors Absa, the broadcast partners and other relevant stakeholders regarding the extraordinary circumstances relating to the passing and funeral of the late Orlando Pirates and Bafana Bafana captain, Senzo Meyiwa,” the PSL said in a statement.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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Virtual Networks for Virtual Applications

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting klint finley 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Tags:#solution-series#Virtualization You’ve prepared your critical applications for virtualization. You’ve tested and selected a virtualization platform. You’ve built out a fleet of virtual servers and migrated your applications to them. Your hypervisor is configured and you’re ready to start sending your uses to your spiffy new virtual environment. Wait. There’s one more step you may want to take.Just because your servers are virtual doesn’t mean they don’t need network infrastructure. Running multiple virtual servers on the same machine can create I/O bottlenecks and reduce the efficiency of your applications. Fortunately, you can use virtual I/O technology to make sure you’re getting the most out of your network infrastructure and eliminate bottlenecks.A typical hypervisor environment will require six to eight physical network cards. Each of those cards will need a network cable, and each cable will need a port on a switch. Your virtual servers are getting physical fast.I/O virtualization provides virtual network cards that satisfy these requirements without requiring actual physical cards. The hypervisors can’t tell the difference. These virtual cards can share a single cable using a single port on a switch, cutting down on the gear required to support your servers.You can use I/O virtualization to:Reduce costs, thanks to having less hardware to purchase.Reduce complexity, thanks to having fewer cables and a central, virtual place to manage connections.Reduce space requirements, again thanks to having less hardware and fewer cables.Some I/O virtualization solutions also offer bandwidth throttling. In a physical networking environment you’re typically faced with a choice of using either a one GB connection or a 10 GB connection. If you have a server that requires three GB of bandwidth you’d need to provide a 10 GB connection. The other seven GB of capacity are wasted. Worse, if a server that typically doesn’t need more than a one GB connection suddenly needs two, you need to upgrade the whole connection.Using virtualization, you can allocate capacity to servers however you see fit. If you have three servers requiring three GB each, you can split one 10 GB connection instead of proving three separate 10 GB connections. If one of those servers ends up needing more bandwidth, you can dynamically allocate bandwidth from another server.Several vendors offer I/O virtualization solutions, including established companies like Brocade, Cisco, Dell, HP and IBM as well as younger companies like 3Leaf and Xsigo. Considering the benefits of virtualizing your networks, it’s worth looking into early in your migration plans.Photo by Simon Cockell Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

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Google Is Turning Search Into The Planet’s Biggest Anticipatory System

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Amid a blizzard of announcements at its I/O conference, Google unveiled a major change to its core search product in singularly low-key fashion.Amit Singhal, a senior Google executive in charge of its search efforts, said that Google search, starting today, wouldn’t just answer the question implied in the words we type into that ubiquitous search box. Google, Singhal said, would display results that “anticipate the next question.”Singhal gave the example of a search for “the population of India.” The searcher wants a number, yes—but it’s likely that they’re on the hunt for more information about India after that. There’s no reason why Google shouldn’t get a jump start on answering those questions.That word Singhal used—”anticipate”—is a powerful one in the field of artificial intelligence. Anticipatory systems, as we’ve written, are a hot field that’s been moving from theory to practice. There are apps today that will recommend a restaurant, a purchase, even a date. And we’ve noted how anticipatory systems are the future of search.But with this latest update, Google is launching the biggest real-world experiment in anticipatory systems ever, with hundreds of millions of its search users getting a glimpse of the anticipatory future today.Google Maps, too, is getting an anticipatory update. Search for the “Walt Disney Family Museum,” a popular San Francisco institution, and you might get another kid-friendly museum suggested, like the Exploratorium, based on the reasonable assumption that you’re looking for a place to go with your family.Singhal said the goal was to introduce “conversational search.” To have a conversation, you need a conversational partner. The voice search features Google rolled out will likely get far more attention. But the anticipatory underpinnings of Google’s new search are far more crucial. Human beings are remarkably good at processing context to anticipate what the people we’re talking to will say next. Now we can really talk to Google. Whether it’s through a keyboard, touchscreen, or microphone doesn’t really matter.Photo by Nick Statt for ReadWrite owen thomas Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#anticipatory systems#Google IO13#search last_img read more

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When You Must Be Impartial

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now A salesperson asked me a very important question. He asked, “How can you be a trusted advisor and consultative salesperson when you are partial to your company?” His point was that if your company and your solution is always right in all cases, then you aren’t giving them the best advice when it is not true. There are a number of factors worth discussing here, the first of which is qualification. If your solution is not right for your prospective client or your your company, then you are right to disqualify them and advise them to do something different. By giving up the deal now, you don’t fail the prospect, and you don’t bring in clients your company is not able to serve. The second factor is a bit trickier. It involves your belief in your company, your solution, and your ability to serve your prospect better than someone else. When you believe that what you sell is a commodity and a lower price is a better deal, you are not being impartial. The fact that you find differentiating more difficult isn’t impartiality. Instead, you are really just skeptical of your company’s business model. When you believe that because your solution is more difficult to sell, it makes another choice better because it is easier, you are not being impartial. There are always going to be competitors who choose to make selling easier by lowering their prices, making concessions, allowing the client to believe that producing better results won’t require them to change, and a dozen other strategies that allow them to win by saying yes to things that you cannot say yes too. These things do not make the competitor a better choice; they just make it more difficult for you to win. You can be impartial as it pertains to the advice you give your prospective client, but that impartiality should be exercised early in your conversations. By being impartial, you place the relationship above the transaction, increasing the likelihood that you gain an opportunity to work with them in the future.last_img read more

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Post-Parrikar, BJP loses Panaji, gain for Congress

first_imgAfter 25 years consecutive run, the BJP on Thursday lost the Panaji Assembly constituency to Congress’s Atanasio Monserrate by 1,758 votes. The seat was represented by late Goa Chief Minister and former Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar for a maximum period since 1994.While Mr. Monserrate polled 8,748 votes, the BJP candidate polled 6,990 votes. AAP’s Valmiki Naik and Subhash Velingkar of the Goa Suraksha Manch polled 236 and 516 votes, respectively. “This is a victory of the Congress party and a vote for the development of the State capital, which it was deprived of, for the last so many years,” Mr. Monserrate said after the result was announced. The by-poll in Panaji Assembly constituency was held following the death of MLA and Chief Minister Parrikar on March 17 following a prolonged battle with pancreatic cancer. Mr. Parrikar had first won in Panaji in 1994 and retained it until 2014 when he was inducted in Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Cabinet. In his absence, the seat was represented twice by his aide Mr. Kuncalienkar. On his return to State politics in 2017, Mr. Parrikar was once again elected Panaji MLA in a by-poll held following his taking over as Chief Minister of BJP-led coalition government. The BJP’s campaign had received a setback after party workers resented the manner in which late Parrikar’s elder son Utpal was snubbed by the party’s State leadership in his bid for the ticket for the Panaji by-poll. In a Facebook post on Thursday, Mr. Utpal Parrikar said that the loss of Panaji seat was very painful.“Having said that, I am only reminded of words uttered by our late leader Atalji when BJP was reduced to two seats in Lok Sabha. ‘Darkness will be dispelled, Sun will rise and Lotus will bloom’. In democracy collective wisdom always lies with the people. Hard work is needed to win back people’s trust,” said Mr.Utpal.last_img read more